Today, August 10, 2018, is the compliance date for the health warnings contained in the FDA’s Deeming Rule and codified in 21 C.F.R. Part 1143.  In particular, as of today, roll-your-own (RYO) tobacco, cigarette tobacco, or covered tobacco products (except cigars and pipe tobacco) such as e-liquids that contain tobacco-derived nicotine manufactured, packaged, sold, offered for sale, distributed, or imported for sale or distribution within the United States must bear the required warning statement (i.e., “WARNING: This product contains nicotine.  Nicotine is an addictive chemical.”) on the package label, per 21 C.F.R. § 1143.3(a)(1).  This warning statement requirement also applies to advertising (including websites and social media) for RYO tobacco, cigarette tobacco, and covered tobacco products (except cigars and pipe tobacco).

The warning statement must also comply with certain requirements, with respect to font, text, size, placement, and formatting of the warning statement on the package labels.  Indeed, the regulation requires that the required warning statement “appear directly on the package” and “be clearly visible underneath any cellophane or other clear wrapping as follows”:

  • Be located in a conspicuous and prominent place on the two “principal display panels” of the package;
  • Comprise at least 30 percent of each of the principal display panels;
  • Be printed in at least 12-point font size and must occupy the greatest possible proportion of the warning label area set aside for the required text;
  • Be printed in conspicuous and legible Helvetica bold or Arial bold type or other similar sans serif fonts and in black text on a white background or white text on a black background in a manner that contrasts by typography, layout, or color, with all other printed material on the package;
  • Be capitalized and punctuated as indicated in 21 CFR § 1143.3(a)(1); and
  • Be centered in the warning area in which the text is required to be printed and positioned such that the text of the required warning statement and the other information on the principal display panels have the same orientation.[1]

For covered tobacco products (other than cigars), cigarette tobacco products, and RYO tobacco products that are too small or otherwise unable to accommodate a label with sufficient space to bear the required warning statement, the required warning statement must appear on one of the following: carton, outer container, wrapper, or tag firmly and permanently affixed to the tobacco product package.

Compliance Policy and Safe Harbor for Retailers

FDA created a compliance policy for the 21 C.F.R. § 1143.3 nicotine addiction warning in its Guidance Document, Extension of Certain Tobacco Product Compliance Deadlines Related to the Final Deeming Rule, which provides (on page 5):

 

The Deeming Rule also contains a retailer safe harbor, which provides that a retailer of cigarette tobacco, RYO tobacco, or covered tobacco products (other than cigars) will not be in violation of 21 C.F.R. § 1143.3 for packaging that: (i) contains a health warning; (ii) is supplied to the retailer by the tobacco product manufacturer, importer, or distributor, who has the required state, local, or Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB)-issued license or permit, if applicable; and (iii) is not altered by the retailer in a material way.[2]

If you have questions about the compliance policy or the retailer safe harbor, please let us know.

Alternative Required Warning Statement for Zero Nicotine Products

For products that do not contain nicotine, but that are made or derived from tobacco, a tobacco product manufacturer is permitted to display an alternative statement (i.e., “This product is made from tobacco”) on all packages and advertisements in accordance with the requirements of 21 C.F.R. § 1143.3.  An example of such a product would be a zero-nicotine e-liquid that contains tobacco-derived flavors or extracts.  To be permitted to make such a statement, manufacturers are required to submit a confirmation statement to FDA certifying to be true that the product does not contain nicotine and that the tobacco product manufacturer has data to support that assertion.[3] If you would like to submit such a self-certification to FDA, let us know.

A zero-nicotine e-liquid that does not contain any other tobacco-derived ingredients is not a covered tobacco product subject to either the nicotine addiction warning or alternative statement.

Effect of Injunction in Cigar Association of America v. FDA

Importantly, due to a recent decision by the United States District Court for the District of Columbia, the warnings set forth in 21 C.F.R. §§ 1143.3 and 1143.5 are not applicable to cigars and pipe tobacco until 60 days after final disposition of the plaintiffs’ appeal of the courts’ order on the health warning requirements.[4]   FDA has stated that the Agency intends to comply with the court’s order in Cigar Association of America.[5]  Further, FDA explained that the Agency does not intend to enforce the labeling requirements under sections 903(a)(2) (i.e., requirement that label contain the name and place of business of the tobacco product manufacturer, packer, or distributor; an accurate statement of the quantity of contents in terms of weight, measure, or numerical count; and an accurate statement of the percentage of domestically grown vs. foreign grown tobacco) and 920(a)(1) (i.e., requirement to bear “Sale only allowed in the United States” statement) for cigars and pipe tobacco while the injunction is in effect so that firms are able to make required label changes at one time.[6]

Notably, the court’s order does not enjoin FDA from enforcing the health warning requirements for other product categories, including electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) products, hookah tobacco, and cigarette tobacco and RYO tobacco.

Other Labeling Requirements

The Deeming Rule also imposed additional labeling requirements on newly deemed products. For example, tobacco products deemed under the Deeming Rule to be subject to FDA’s authority, if in package form, are required to bear a label containing:

  • the name and place of business of the tobacco product manufacturer, packer, or distributor;
  • an accurate statement of the quantity of the contents in terms of weight, measure, or numerical count; and
  • the statement “Sale only allowed in the United States” on labels, packaging, and shipping containers pursuant to Section 920(a) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FDCA).

In addition, pursuant to Section 903(a)(2)(C) of the FDCA, a tobacco product in package form is misbranded if its label does not include an accurate statement of the percentage of foreign and domestic grown tobacco used in the product.  However, in a draft guidance document entitled, “Interpretation of and Compliance Policy for Certain Label Requirement; Applicability of Certain Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act Requirements to Vape Shops,” FDA stated that, at this time, it does not intend to enforce this requirement for products made or derived from tobacco, such as tobacco-derived liquid nicotine and e-liquid made or derived from tobacco.[7]  FDA explained that it provided this compliance policy “because it recognizes the current difficulty, in many circumstances, qualifying the percentage of foreign and domestic grown tobacco used in these products.”[8]

If you have any questions about warning requirements for product labels and advertisements or any of the other Tobacco and Control Act requirements, contact Azim Chowdhury, Partner (202) 434.4230, (chowdhury@khlaw.com).  For more information on our Tobacco and E-Vapor Practice in general, visit www.khlaw.com/evapor. You can also follow Azim Chowdhury on Twitter for updates.

[1] 21 C.F.R. § 1143.3(a)(2).

[2] 21 C.F.R. § 1143.3(a)(3).

[3] 21 C.F.R. § 1143.3(c).

[4] See Order, Cigar Ass’n of Am. v. U.S. Food & Drug Admin., No. 1:16-cv-01460 (D.D.C. July 5, 2018).

[5] See FDA, “Covered” Tobacco products and Roll-Your-Own Cigarette Tobacco Labeling and Warning Statement Requirements, https://www.fda.gov/TobaccoProducts/Labeling/Labeling/ucm524470.htm?utm_source=CTPTwitter&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=ctp-warninglabel.

[6] See Deeming Tobacco Products to be Subject to the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, as Amended by the Family Smoking Prevention and tobacco Control Act; Restrictions on the Sale and Distribution of Tobacco Products and Required Warning Statements for Tobacco Products, 81 Fed. Reg. 28974, 29006 (noting that the compliance date for the 903(a)(2) and 920(a)91) requirements is intended to match the date for health warnings).

[7] FDA, Draft Guidance for Industry: Interpretation of and Compliance Policy for Certain Label Requirement; Applicability of Certain Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act Requirements to Vape Shops (Jan. 2017), https://www.fda.gov/downloads/TobaccoProducts/Labeling/RulesRegulationsGuidance/UCM536997.pdf .

[8] Id., at 5-6.

View Original Source
Print:
EmailTweetLikeLinkedInGoogle Plus
Photo of Azim Chowdhury Azim Chowdhury

Azim Chowdhury is a regulatory and public policy attorney with a focus on vapor, nicotine and tobacco product regulation. He is a Partner in Keller and Heckman’s nationally-ranked food and drug law practice.

Mr. Chowdhury advises domestic and foreign corporations in matters of Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and international regulatory compliance. In particular, he has developed expertise in tobacco and vapor product regulation relating to the implementation of the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act, and spearheaded the Tobacco and E-Vapor practice at Keller and Heckman. Specifically, Mr. Chowdhury has experience representing tobacco, e-cigarette and e-liquid manufacturers, distributors, retailers, suppliers and trade associations in matters of FDA, state and global regulatory compliance. He also assists corporations in establishing clearances for food and drug additives in the U.S., Canada, and European Union, with an emphasis on indirect additives used in food-contact materials.

Mr. Chowdhury is also a frequent contributor to the Food and Drug Law Institute’s (FDLI) Update Magazine, has served on the Editorial Advisory Board of the Food and Drug Law Journal, and has authored and edited numerous articles and publications, including Tobacco Regulation and Compliance: An Essential Resource, FDA Regulation of Tobacco: A Comprehensive Guide – An FDLI Primer and Tobacco and Nicotine Delivery: Regulation and Compliance, 2nd Edition. He frequently speaks at industry conferences and events, was featured in U.S. News and World Reports Best Lawyers Edition (2016) and was named one of “10 Names to Know in the Vape World” in the October 2015 issue of Vape Magazine.

Mr. Chowdhury also has an active pro bono practice through Keller and Heckman’s Pro Bono Program, and has been featured in the Baltimore Sun for successfully obtaining asylum in the United States for a family who fled their home country of El Salvador because of violence they faced from an international gang.

Prior to entering private practice, he served as a judicial law clerk on the Court of Special Appeals of Maryland. Mr. Chowdhury received a B.A. and B.S. from Johns Hopkins University, a MBA from the University of Maryland Robert H. Smith School of Business, and a JD, cum laude, from the University of Maryland School of Law.

Education: Johns Hopkins University (B.A., B.S., 2003); University of Maryland Robert H. Smith School of Business (M.B.A., 2006); University of Maryland School of Law (J.D., 2006, cum laude).

Admissions: District of Columbia; Maryland

Photo of Benjamin Wolf Benjamin Wolf

Benjamin Wolf practices in the area of food and drug law. Mr. Wolf provides state and federal legislative counsel to tobacco and e-vapor suppliers and manufacturers. His practice also includes providing advice to food, dietary supplement, medical device, consumer product, and pharmaceutical clients regarding compliance with domestic and foreign regulations.

Prior to joining Keller and Heckman, Mr. Wolf worked for the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as a regulatory counsel in the Center for Tobacco Products (CTP) and Office of Regulatory Affairs (ORA). In his role as a regulatory counsel, Mr. Wolf worked closely with CTP, ORA, the Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH), and the Office of Combination Products (OCP) to develop and implement policies including tobacco compliance and enforcement, tobacco premarket review, medical device compliance and enforcement, device premarket, and device and combination products good manufacturing practice. This work touched upon areas including tobacco substantial equivalence (SE), premarket tobacco product applications (PMTAs), modified risk tobacco product applications (MRTPAs), investigational tobacco product applications (ITPAs), data integrity, medical device quality metrics, utilization of benefit and risk factors in determining appropriate FDA engagement for devices being marketed, laboratory developed tests (LDTs), and good manufacturing practice (GMPs) for medical devices and combination products.

Also while at the FDA, Mr. Wolf served as a reviewer of certain tobacco premarket applications and submissions; responded to Congressional, Government Accountability Office (GAO) and Office of Inspector General (OIG) inquiries; and trained in bioresearch monitoring for field investigators.

Mr. Wolf’s practice is benefited by his extensive background as a research and development engineer at a medical device company in Boston, Massachusetts. In that role, he gained experience in GMP compliance, preparing regulatory submissions and addressing FDA questions. He has executed numerous bench and animal studies to support regulatory filings.

Prior to law school Mr. Wolf completed graduate-level coursework in Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering at Boston University. While at George Washington University Law School, Mr. Wolf worked as a student attorney assisting clients with proceedings in the Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP). His Student Note, written while serving as a member of the Federal Circuit Bar Journal (FCBJ) and regarding the VICP, was selected for publication as the best Student Note written for the FCBJ during the 2011-2012 academic year. Mr. Wolf was the recipient of the Henry R. Berger Award, awarded to one graduate annually for excellence in tort law.

Photo of Adam Susser Adam Susser

Adam Susser is an associate in the food and drug and tobacco and e-vapor practices at Keller and Heckman. He advises clients on regulatory and compliance matters in industries overseen by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), including the pharmaceutical, medical device, food, dietary supplement, and tobacco industries.

Mr. Susser is frequently asked to present on FDA regulations at industry conferences hosted by the Food and Drug Law Institute (FDLI) and publishes FDA related articles in various forums including FDLI’s Update Magazine.

Mr. Susser graduated with honors from the University of Chicago Law School where he received the Burton and Adrienne Glazov Academic Merit Scholarship. In addition, he devotes his time to many pro bono and community service projects including the D.C. Bar’s Landlord-Tenant Resource Center. Mr. Susser has a background in political science and, while in law school, worked as a legal intern for the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) within the Department of Homeland Security.