I have had the pleasure to be a member of the American Psychological Association, for many years, and to devote myself to continuing graduate-level education in the psychological sciences.  Just as a medical doctor might benefit from a strong background or understanding in, say, nutrition, or kinetics, I have always felt that the practice of Family Law almost requires a fundamental understanding of psychology.  The article below is taken from an essay concerning a family lawyer that trained as a psychologist, and how this training has been integral to his practice.

Using his unique background in psychology, David – who has written a best-selling book called “Moving On: Redesigning Your Emotional, Financial, and Social Life After Divorce” – shares the difference taking into account mental health can make in family law cases.

How do psychology and divorce go hand-in-hand?

Michael Roe

Michael Roe is one of the few lawyers nationwide with experience in high conflict divorce and custody cases involving psychological disorders. His experience has been detailed in the Chicago Tribune, New York Post, and on television and radio. He has been a

Michael Roe is one of the few lawyers nationwide with experience in high conflict divorce and custody cases involving psychological disorders. His experience has been detailed in the Chicago Tribune, New York Post, and on television and radio. He has been a founder of a personality disorders nonprofit, and a director of a national single parent’s organization. Michael Roe has a unique, informed, and sensitive approach to complex issues raised in contested Family Law cases.