The pandemic has transformed millions of employees into overnight virtual workers. The legal industry who was reluctant to embrace technology is now into overdrive on the future of delivering their services to clients.

The coronavirus has also accelerated a major shift to freelancing that is severing ties between companies and employees. Unemployed and furlough paralegals have started or considered freelancing which have added to the increased proportion of the workforce on freelance job platforms. However, many paralegals are turning to freelancing out of necessity, and not by choice. For them it is a way of survival in a recession economy.

Julia Pollak, a labor economist with the job site ZipRecruiter, says there has been a dramatic shift in job postings on the site from permanent to temporary. Due to the uncertainty of the current economy employers are reluctant to hire permanent workers.

Zoom, e-signature, and e-notarization are some of the tools that have companies rethinking permanent staff and renewing lease for physical real estate.

However, even though some paralegals are forced to start virtual/freelance paralegal businesses, research has shown that the vast majority are still looking for permanent, full-time positions that includes benefits such as health care and a steady paycheck.