The term “long haulers” has started being used to describe people who have not fully recovered from COVID-19 weeks or even months after first experiencing symptoms. Some long haulers experience continuous symptoms for weeks or months, while others feel better for weeks, then relapse with old or new symptoms. The most common lingering symptoms are fatigue, body aches, shortness of breath, difficulty concentrating, inability to exercise, headache, and difficulty sleeping.

A new Northwestern Medicine study published this week in the Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology analyzed 100 non-hospitalized COVID-19 long haulers and discovered 85% of patients experienced four or more neurologic symptoms which impacted their quality of life, and in some patients, their cognitive abilities. The study included 100 non-hospitalized COVID-19 long haulers from 21 different states who were seen in-person or via telehealth from May to November 2020.

The long haulers suffered persistent neurological issues, including brain fog, headaches, numbness/ tingling, disorders of taste and smell, and various myalgias. Additionally, 85% reported experiencing chronic fatigue. Among the long haulers who were in the study 47% also reported struggling with anxiety, stress, depression, and sadness. As a result, many patients experienced decreased quality of life and about half the patients in the study missed more than 10 days of work.