Big news in the world of social media! Twitter has updated its single image size settings so that any photograph with a 2:1 or 3:4 size ratio can now be viewed without truncation; in other words, you don’t have to click on the picture to see the whole thing. People are already taking advantage of the change by posting everything from stunning natural scenery to city skylines, as seen here.

Why did it happen?

If you’ve ever stumbled across an “open for a surprise” post on your timeline, you know this is a pretty big deal.

In the past, the way Twitter would cut off images created an unsatisfactory viewer experience. It also made viewing single images a more tedious process by compelling interested users to click on the image to view it in its entirety.

The change came as a result of the app’s users’ feedback, and so far the reaction has been overwhelmingly positive.

Benefits for everyone

The biggest immediate benefit of the change is increased engagement with pictures on Twitter. Users can appreciate an entire photograph simply by scrolling through their timeline and viewing it, instead of clicking on the photo. This will naturally lead more users to actually view and interact with the images, instead of scrolling by a Tweet with a chopped-up image they don’t feel like clicking.

This increased visibility is great news for businesses who may be posting informative flyers and graphics.

Furthermore, it creates a better aesthetic on your followers’ timelines and your profile. It was previously hard to control where images would get cut off, and the new change eliminates that sort of visual awkwardness.

Finally, the change increases overall content consumption on the site because now, it takes less time to interact with each Tweet containing an image, making scrolling more efficient.

What you need to know

Taking advantage of this new update to appeal to potential clients and other consumers will be key to business and firm social media strategies in the coming months.

Here are some of the ways lawyers can optimize these new image sizes. Check out the examples of how other companies are already making it happen:

  • Employee Highlights: If you’re shining the spotlight on a new attorney or other member of your firm, their headshot or quote graphic just became a much more viewable experience.

  • Infographics: Informative content or step-by-step instructions written out are a helpful tool for clients looking to get connected with your firm beyond social media.

  • News highlights: Looking for a way to update clients on new developments in your practice without slinging loads of paragraphs at them? An easy-to-read graphic with the main point called out may be the way to go.

  • Quote graphics: Already popular to promote content, you can now make these tall to be more eye-catching—and occupy more real estate on social feeds. Use these to call out the thesis or most pointed statement in your blog post and lure people in.

Moving forward, when you are uploading a graphic or image, it should ideally fit within the 2:1 or 3:4 ratio so that you can reap the benefits of the change. A helpful tool that I recommend for resizing your images is Pixlr. If you’re looking for an easy tool to help you craft the content listed above, we recommend Affinity Photo.

Also, keep in mind this format change applies to other forms of media. You can now use taller GIFs or videos on Twitter and, similarly, not have them cropped.

Photo of Sophia Singh Sophia Singh

Sophie is a Legal Community Reporter on LexBlog’s Publishing team where she creates, edits, and shares content about the network’s members through multiple mediums, including blog posts, videos, and podcasts. She is passionate about tenants’ rights, specifically in New York City, and has

Sophie is a Legal Community Reporter on LexBlog’s Publishing team where she creates, edits, and shares content about the network’s members through multiple mediums, including blog posts, videos, and podcasts. She is passionate about tenants’ rights, specifically in New York City, and has written about the issue on her personal blog, The Price of Presence. Currently living in the Bronx, Sophie will soon be moving to Manhattan and attending Fordham Law School in Fall 2021.