Free time in law school is incredibly rare, so the decision to join student or professional organizations can be difficult. Ultimately, these organizations provide more help than the work that you have to put into one.

Joining

Becoming a member of an organization is important. These organizations provide an opportunity to network with others in the legal field and get to know other young lawyers and future lawyers. While it is fun to branch out and meet people not involved with law school or the legal profession, finding individuals that understand your schedule and commitments is important. Last but certainly not least, when you join organizations you often gain access to the group’s outline bank. While I wouldn’t suggest using someone else’s outline as your sole study source, these can come in handy when trying to figure out difficult cases or topics during finals.

Executive Board

The true resume builder is joining the executive board of an organization. When you are elected a position for an organization, it shows that your fellow law students trust in you to lead them and provide a positive experience to members. Interviewers love to hear about leadership opportunities you have taken and demonstrating that you were elected to a position in extracurriculars really shows dedication to helping others within law school. Showing commitment to things in law school besides your grades is a bonus for any interviewer for summer positions.

Ultimately, joining organizations in law school is worth the effort but with limited spare time, pickiness over the one’s to participate in is of the utmost importance.

About the Author:

In May of 2020, Hannah graduated with a B.A. in Public Relations and a B.A. in Psychology from Auburn University. After working at Ankin Law Office for almost a year, Hannah discovered an interest in law and joined the Chicago-Kent community. Hannah is currently a 2L representative for the Society of Women in Law, as well as a member of various organizations matching her passions, such as the First-Generation Law Student Association and the Chicago Kent Animal Legal Defense Fund. Following graduation, Hannah looks forward to a career in estate planning, real estate, or business law.