Jump To: Table of Contents | Civil Decisions | Criminal Decisions | Ontario Review Board Good evening. Please find below our summaries of the civil decisions of the Court of Appeal for Ontario. In Hughes v. Liquor Control Board of Ontario, the Court affirmed a motion judge’s dismissal of a proposed class action against the LCBO stemming from an agreement between the LCBO and Brewer’s Retail which provided terms for the sale of beer in Ontario.…
Last time, we reviewed the data on the Court’s employment law cases from 2000 to 2010 and began looking at the data for the past nine years.  Today, we review the remainder of the data, as well as looking at the overall numbers. Since employment law cases have been so rare since 2010, we combine the data for defendants who won at the Appellate Court and plaintiffs who won below.  Since 2010, defendants who won…
Last time, we began our review of the Court’s recent history with employment law cases, covering the years 1990 through 1999.  Today, our review continues with the years 2000 through 2009. The Court’s employment law docket tailed off during our second ten years, from nineteen cases between 1990 and 1999 to fourteen in the period 2000-2009.  However, the Court continued to accept for review slightly more defense wins from the Appellate Court than plaintiffs’ wins…
Hand down list James Allen Insurance Brokers and Certain Underwriters at Lloyd’s, London, Subscribing to Certificate NO. FRO-100944 v. First Financial Bank – binder of insurance – The Feazells have a chicken farm.  The farm is  secured by  loans from First Financial Bank.  In December 2013 the Feazells  requested a new policy of insurance from Lloyds with an effective date of December 13, 2013.   Their agent IAM  obtained a quote of $7,429.34 which must…
The U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral arguments Monday in a case from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit that likely will decide whether a Sioux Falls, S.D., newspaper should have access to food-stamp spending at specific retail stores. Considerable interest has been generated by this case. More than a dozen organizations – representing the retail industry, public interest groups and First Amendment advocates – have filed friend-of-the-court briefs in the case.…
Recently we discussed academic criticism claiming that circuit courts may respond to increased caseload pressure by spending less time per case or lengthening the appeals process.  We found evidence suggesting that this is not occurring at the Sixth Circuit.  One interesting side note that our analysis showed is that the percentage of written decisions has increased significantly over the past decade.  We have calculated that the percentage of total appeals that end in a written…
In this week’s episode of “Bull,” Dr. Bull and team are representing Trent Bolton, a retired FBI-agent-turned-bounty-hunter whose first gig goes wildly off the rails: He finds his mark, threatens him with a gun, knocks him unconscious, zip-ties his hands and tosses him into his trunk for a secure delivery to the bail bondsman. Unfortunately, the guy in the trunk—Michael Cole—isn’t the actual target. Oops. Upon learning of his mistake, Bolton takes the unconscious Cole…
Hand down list In the Matter of the Estate of Lee House Burford, Deceased: Ginger Richards and Kimberly Archer, as Co-Managers of the Blackburn Firm LLC v. Walter Wendell Freeman, Executor – contract where one party dies –  In 2008, Lee House Burford hired Barry Blackburn to assist him with estate planning.   The contract called for a payment of  $265,000.00 upon Burford’s demise.  Six years later, Blackburn died. A year later Burford died. …
Today, we’re continuing the prologue of our tour through the law of the Foreign Trade Antitrust Improvement Act, surveying the antitrust law of foreign-based transactions in the years leading up to enactment of the FTAIA.  In our first installment, we reviewed the Supreme Court’s decision in American Banana Co. v. United Fruit Company, 213 U.S. 347 (1909), where the Court held that an antitrust conspiracy to take actions overseas was not within the reach of…
When welcoming his (many) new colleagues, Judge Sutton has sometimes mentioned his court’s long-lost nickname: “The Learned Sixth.” Many of its earliest judges—Taft, Day, Lurton, Howell Jackson—served as diplomats or law school deans, cooled their heels at the Sixth Circuit, and proceeded to the Supreme Court. Is the Sixth Circuit recovering its name and reputation? Several current judges have appeared on shortlists of potential Supreme Court nominees. And as for the…