Amanda Tummons

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Amanda advises local, national and international clients, working with them to find practical solutions to business problems. She has substantial experience negotiating and managing contracts required for the ongoing business operations of the clients with whom she works. Amanda also counsels companies through mergers and acquisitions and in beginning new business ventures, including drafting complex shareholder agreements, buy-sell agreements and operating agreements.

As a member of Husch Blackwell’s Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) group, Amanda counsels clients on lawful commercial use of UAS and closely monitors the development of the framework for UAS. Her work with manufacturers and operators in the aviation industry that have implemented new technologies gives her insight into the challenges and opportunities that clients might face.

Latest Articles

The Federal Aviation Administration’s 2017 Unmanned Aircraft Systems (“UAS”) Symposium opened on March 27, 2017. Through the first two days of the conference, the FAA has focused on its efforts to work with UAS industry stakeholders to facilitate the integration of UAS into the national airspace system (“NAS”).  In particular, the FAA has focused on three main issues: (1) the promulgation of performance based standards to accommodate future operations as UAS technology evolves; (2) the…
Day Two of the FAA’s 2016 Unmanned Aircraft Systems Symposium built onto the discussions from Day One. Day Two was spent in breakout sessions intended to allow the FAA to listen to industry and stakeholder concerns, questions and ideas.  The breakout sessions were filled with robust dialogue and information sharing. While the breakout sessions covered multiple topics, including certification, airspace management, and research and technology issues, a few common themes emerged:…
On September 2, 2015, the FAA issued a replacement for the long standing Advisory Circular 91-57 that was issued on June 9, 1981.  Advisory Circular 91-57 (AC 91-57) was originally issued as guidance for model aircraft operators.  More recently, AC 91-57 has gained additional notoriety because it has been relied upon in judicial decisions regarding the applicability of the Federal Aviation Regulations to the operation of unmanned aircraft.  See e.g. Huerta v. Pirker, NTSB Docket…
The Federal Aviation Administration posted a win this week when the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) issued its decision reversing and remanding the decisional order issued by an administrative law judge (ALJ) in the case of Michael Huerta, Administrator, Federal Aviation Administration v. Raphael Pirker.…
So far in the month of August the FAA has taken at least 3 steps towards integration of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) into the national airspace system. The first step was the issuance of a Chief Counsel Opinion on August 8.  The opinion addressed whether certain documents that are required by the FARs to be kept on an aircraft may be kept at a UAS control station.  The opinion found that keeping these required documents…
On June 18, 2014, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) issued a Notice of Interpretation (the Notice) regarding the special rule that exempts regulation of model aircraft under the FAA Modernization and Reform Act.  Such interpretation was initially open for public comment through July 25, 2014 (see Husch Blackwell industry alert here) but was later extended through September 23, 2014 (see TMT Industry Insider article here).…
By September 2015 the FAA is to publish proposed rules for the integration of small unmanned aircraft systems (UAS), or drones, into the National Airspace System (NAS).  All indications are that those rules will relate to safety and will not focus on privacy issues.  Privacy issues, however, are a big concern for citizens.  It has been reported that President Obama intends to issue an executive order to develop privacy guidelines for commercial UAS operations in…
Last week the media reported on two specific drone or unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) flights that highlight the issues that are being faced when it comes to operation of UAS.  One happened at 2,300 above ground in March of this year but is only being reported just now (see Near Mid-Air Collision Emphasizes Need for Drone Regulations, New Technology).  The other instance occurred in St. Louis, Missouri when a partially broken UAS was found…
While pressure mounts for the FAA to issue regulations to incorporate unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) into national airspace systems and the challenges to the FAA’s current positions on UAS are in judicial limbo [see Commercial Use of Unmanned Aerial Systems? Are they legal? and FAA Faces Recent Challenges Over Restrictions on Operation of Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS)] the FAA continues to move forward with the mandates set forth in the FAA Modernization and Reform…