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A boom in automobile technology and connectivity in 2018 further boosted expectations of consumers regarding the integration and functionality of their devices and vehicles. Automobile manufacturers have responded by developing cars that often include the services of a digital chauffeur, navigator, receptionist, and personal assistant. Automobiles are also expected to communicate with other systems and with the driver’s personal devices, as well as the applications and software services contained therein. As cars increasingly become more…
The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) recently proposed two new rules designed to increase patient and provider access to health records. As stated by HHS in its press release, the proposed rules “will support seamless and secure access, exchange, and use of electronic health information.” These proposed rules stem from two separate components within HHS – the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) and the Office of the National Coordinator for Health…
On September 26, 2018, a record settlement was reached between Uber and the attorneys general of all 50 states and the District of Columbia over the company’s 2016 data breach. While this case presents an extreme example of corporate misconduct on behalf of its former management, this settlement is unique in the imposition of stringent privacy protection requirements that Uber must incorporate into its business practices.…
As cars continue to rely more and more on systems that closely resemble those that run mobile phones and personal computers, it’s no surprise that the original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) and suppliers of car parts need to make major adjustments. While meeting these evolving demands on the production end, OEMs and suppliers also need to carefully navigate the new legal and compliance landmines that come with the shifting emphasis on cybersecurity.…
It’s a fact: today’s marketplace has given connected cars the green light. As an OEM or supplier accelerating to create products to meet industry demand, what challenges can you anticipate in 2017? Here is the second installment (following up our post on IP Protection) describing where we believe your attention should be focused during the upcoming year……
It’s a fact: today’s marketplace has given connected cars the green light. As an OEM or supplier accelerating to create products to meet industry demand, what challenges can you anticipate in 2017? Here is the second installment (following up our post on IP Protection) describing where we believe your attention should be focused during the upcoming year……
It’s a fact: today’s marketplace has given connected cars the green light. As an OEM or supplier accelerating to create products to meet industry demand, what challenges can you anticipate in 2017? Here’s one area we think you should be focused on… IP Protection Perhaps the most valuable asset for companies in advanced technology areas is the protection and defense of the company’s intellectual property. As technologies for connected cars and autonomous vehicle develop, manufacturers…
This blog post is the first in an on-going series of blogs and articles by Dashboard Insights on the implications to the automotive industry of the June 23, 2016 referendum decision in the United Kingdom (“UK”) to exit the European Union (“EU”). This first blog will reprise briefly developments leading to the Brexit vote, the process that now appears likely to unfold and the implications as the UK changes its relationship with the EU. Suffice…
A recent study by a well-known information security company captures one of the most common information security fallacies: that information security is a technology problem. Most manufacturers, along with many other businesses, view mitigating information security risks as falling squarely in the purview of their information technology department. However, this study reports that human error actually accounted for nearly two-thirds of security compromises, far exceeding causes like insecure websites and hacking. While technological measures (e.g.,…
A recent study by a well-known information security company captures one of the most common information security fallacies: that information security is a technology problem. Most businesses view mitigating information security risks as falling squarely in the purview of their information technology department. However, this study reports that human error actually accounted for nearly two-thirds of security compromises, far exceeding causes like insecure websites and hacking.1 While technological measures (such as anti-virus software, access controls,…