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The cardinal principle of copyright law is deceptively simple. It protects a creative work as it passes from the fevered brow of its creator to something more tangible – a writing pad, an electronic manuscript, a sound recording, a stone tablet, etc., and, at that moment, ownership vests in the creator. But, of course, deceptively simple rules never are and always have exceptions.  In this instance, one of those exceptions is the so-called Work Made
There is no question that the use of robots, along with other similar technological changes in the workplace, will continue to eliminate or downgrade jobs. Indeed, it has been estimated that on average, each workplace robot eliminates six jobs. This article will examine (1) the impact such changes will have on women and (2) whether these changes can be subject to legal challenge as prohibited gender discrimination.…
There is no question that the use of robots, along with other similar technological changes in the workplace, will continue to eliminate or downgrade jobs. Indeed, it has been estimated that on average, each workplace robot eliminates six jobs. This article will examine (1) the impact such changes will have on women and (2) whether these changes can be subject to legal challenge as prohibited gender discrimination.…
The “Persuader Rule” — Brief Background After several years of review and public comment, on March 24, 2016, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) issued its new interpretation of the so-called “Persuader Rule.” The new interpretation changed more than 50 years of DOL policy under which employers and consultants had no duty to report “persuasive activity,” (that is advice, memoranda, bulletins, etc. intended to persuade employees to vote against unionization) so long as there was…
As we have previously reported, in March of 2016, the Department of Labor (“DOL”) issued a reinterpretation of the Persuader Activities Rule (The “Revised Rule”). This Revised Rule required that: employers must annually report agreements that have the object of dissuading employees from supporting unions (“persuader activities agreements”); consultants must report such persuader activities agreements within 30 days; and consultants who enter persuader activities agreements must report payments from employers for all “labor relations…
As employers may be aware, on March 24, 2016, the Office of Labor-Management Services (OLMS), an agency in the federal Department of Labor (DOL), issued a new interpretation of the so-called “Persuader Rule” that would have imposed significantly expanded reporting obligations on employers, consultants, and attorneys during union organizing and similar activities.  OLMS “reinterpreted” its long-standing position (in place for over half a century) that reportable persuader activity only occurred when there was direct contact…
The federal Office of Labor-Management Standards (“OLMS”) in the Department of Labor issued a Final Rule, on March 24, 2016, that significantly reinterprets the so-called Persuader Activities Rule. This rule represents the administrative implementation of provisions in the National Labor Relations Act that require (1) employers to annually report agreements that have the object of dissuading employees from supporting unions (“persuader activities agreements”), (2) consultants to report such persuader activities agreements within thirty days, and (3)…