Jonathan Schmalfeld

Photo of Jonathan Schmalfeld

Naturally competitive, Jonathan prepares for every case as if it will go to trial. Jonathan’s practice involves litigation of intellectual property (IP), real estate and commercial matters. In his intellectual property practice, Jonathan litigates trade secret disputes in federal courts across the country, including Missouri, Illinois and California, and represents clients before the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board.

Latest Articles

According to Lex Machina’s 2018 Trade Secret Litigation Report, the number of trade secret cases pursued in U.S. federal courts has increased rapidly since the 2016 enactment of the Defend Trade Secrets Act (DTSA), which granted federal court subject matter jurisdiction over claims raised under the Act. Last year provided a number of interesting precedential decisions on various topics within the realm of trade secrets law, many of which will no doubt shape litigation tactics…
On May 18, 2016 the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (“NTIA”) released a set of voluntary best practices for commercial and private unmanned aircraft systems (“UAS”) use. That best practice guide was the end result of a development process involving input from individuals and entities in the commercial, academic, civil, and government sectors. Some of these best practices include requiring drone operators to: Minimize operations over or within private property without consent of the property…
The FAA issued a major announcement yesterday on the use of Unmanned Aircraft Systems (“UAS”) for educational institutions (link).  Students of educational institutions no longer need a Section 333 exemption or other authorization to fly under certain conditions, provided that they follow the rules for model aircraft.…
On March 29, 2016, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) raised the maximum permissible operating altitude for commercial and governmental unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) weighing less than 55 pounds from 200 feet to 400 feet. This increase is for the “blanket” Certificate of Waiver or Authorization (“COA”) under Section 333. Until now, commercial and governmental UAS required special authorization to operate above 200 feet.…
On March 9, 2016, the Senate introduced the FAA Reauthorization Act of 2016 (S. 2658), and it contains the following provisions related to unmanned aircraft systems (“UAS”) regulation and consumer protection: Directs the FAA to develop an online knowledge and safety test which operators of UAS must pass before flying. Directs the FAA and NASA to develop a pilot program for a UAS traffic management system, with 6 test sites. Directs both the National…
On February 11, 2016, H.R. 4441 – the Aircraft Innovation Reform and Reauthorization Act (“AIRR Act”) passed out of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee (“T&I Committee”). According to T&I Committee chairman, Representative Bill Shuster, “[t]he committee considered approximately 75 amendments during today’s meeting and more than half of them were approved.” Of the amendments which were passed, the ones affecting the Unmanned Aircraft Systems (“UAS”) include the following: An amendment striking the liability insurance…
The Federal Aviation Administration and Department of Transportation announced today interim final rules (available to read in full here) regarding registration of small unmanned aircraft (“UAS”) weighing over 0.55 pounds and less than 55 pounds. These new rules will take effect on December 21, 2015. Many of these rules were recommended by a report issued by a 25-member Registration Task Force in November of this year (available here). In a press release announcing…