Julia Brodsky

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Julia Brodsky is an Associate in the Labor & Employment Law Department in the Los Angeles office, where she focuses her practice on employment litigation on behalf of management, including actions involving sexual harassment; retaliation; discrimination on the basis of sex, age, race, religion and disability; whistle-blowing; fraud and wrongful termination. She also has extensive experience with wage and hour class actions involving claims for meal and rest break penalties, overtime wages, misclassification and other wage and hour claims.Julia also advises management on various issues ranging from harassment and discrimination and managing leaves of absence under the Family and Medical Leave Act and state laws, to traditional labor law issues.Julia has represented employers in a variety of industries, including health care, insurance, entertainment, retail, manufacturing, universities, media and financial services.During law school, Julia worked as an extern for the Honorable Justice Miriam Vogel at the California Court of Appeal for the Second District.

Latest Articles

On January 17, 2014, the National Labor Relations Board Judge Lisa D. Thompson concluded that an agreement that did not prohibit class or collective action still violated Section 8(a)(1) of the National Labor Relations Act because the Agreement “interfere[d], restrain[ed], or coerce[d]” plaintiff and other similarly situated employees’ “substantive rights to file classwide litigation.”  This ruling stems from Cunningham v. Leslie’s Poolmart, Inc., an overtime class action lawsuit, alleging that Leslie’s compensation plan failed to…
As we recently reported here, there have been a number of appellate decisions ordering class certification based on the existence of an employer’s companywide policy – all while overlooking numerous individualized questions that would undoubtedly create manageability problems during trial.  On December 30, 2013, the California Court of Appeal in Johnson v. California Pizza Kitchen, Inc., 2013 WL 6858373 (Cal. App. 2 Dist. Dec. 30 2013) anticipated these trial management issues and upheld the…
As we recently reported here, there have been a number of appellate decisions ordering class certification based on the existence of an employer’s companywide policy – all while overlooking numerous individualized questions that would undoubtedly create manageability problems during trial.  On December 30, 2013, the California Court of Appeal in Johnson v. California Pizza Kitchen, Inc., 2013 WL 6858373 (Cal. App. 2 Dist. Dec. 30 2013) anticipated these trial management issues and upheld…
A bill that would have allowed California employers to offer employees a flexible workweek schedule has failed to pass the California Assembly Committee on Labor and Employment in a 5-2 party-line vote. The Committee rejected Assembly Bill 907 on the ground that the proposed law would “lead to employee intimidation and a breakdown of the eight-hour work day.” The bill, which was opposed by Democrats and the California Labor Federation, would have allowed employees to…
Effective January 1, 2013, California employers will be required to accommodate their employees’ religious dress and grooming practices. Governor Brown has signed into law the “Workplace Religious Freedom Act of 2012” (authored by Assemblymember Mariko Yamada (D-Davis)), which specifies that religious dress and grooming practices shall be considered a protected religious observance under the California Fair Employment and Housing Act.…