Mark Snider

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Mark counsels clients in a number of industries regarding a range of business concerns. He helps businesses plan for and manage their tax obligations. In particular, Mark has represented investors and developers in numerous housing and tax credit transactions. His tax work also extends to advising clients as to corporate, partnership and individual tax issues at both the federal and state level. Mark has considerable experience representing taxpayers regarding state and local tax issues, including sales and use tax, income taxes, nonresident taxation, and property taxes. Further, Mark has advised landowners and lessees in the oil and gas business regarding federal income tax and state and local tax issues.  In addition, Mark works with clients to implement business transactions that allow companies to grow and adapt to changing business conditions. His work in this area includes negotiating purchases and sales of businesses as well as entity selection and formation and general business planning. Mark also counsels health care clients regarding tax structuring and transaction issues.

Latest Articles

Many thanks to Kevin Scott for his assistance in preparing this post. On June 14, 2018, Governor Kasich signed into law H.B. 430 which will go into effect in September of 2018. The bill clarifies the language covering sales and use tax exemptions for certain oil and gas industry participants. Specifically, the new law modifies the existing statute governing the sales and use tax exemption for property used directly in producing oil or gas. Following…
On June 21, 2018, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Wayfair v. South Dakota that internet and catalogue retailers can be required to collect sales taxes from customers in states where they have no physical presence. In plain English, in most situations, no more tax-free shopping on the internet. Buyers have always technically been required to pay a use tax to their state if no sales tax was collected by the seller. This decision overrules…
On September 26, 2016, Rep. Armstutz introduced two pieces of legislation in the Ohio House that could impact the tax rate of the Ohio financial institutions tax (“FIT”) that is paid by banks and other financial institutions doing business in Ohio. These bills are H.B. 599 and H.B. 600.  These bills are alternatives.  Both would not be enacted. The FIT took effect starting in 2014 and replaced the Ohio corporate franchise tax and dealers in…
In September, at the request of an Ohio-based national bank, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency issued an opinion challenging the application of the Ohio Financial Institutions Tax (FIT) to national banks with their principal office in Ohio. The opinion held that the FIT contradicted a federal statute that provides a national bank should be treated as a state bank chartered by the state in which the national bank has its principal office…
In Comptroller of Treasury of Maryland v. Wynne, 135 U.S. 1787 (2015), the Supreme Court held that Maryland’s tax scheme was unconstitutional because it discouraged interstate commerce in violation of the Dormant Commerce Clause of the U.S. Constitution. Maryland’s tax scheme gave taxpayers credit for taxes paid to other states against the Maryland state income tax, but did not provide a credit against the county income tax. Therefore, out-of-state income was subject to double taxation,…
On Feb. 11, 2015, the biennial budget bill appropriating money for 2015 and 2016 was introduced in the Ohio House of Representatives. The bill incorporates Gov. Kasich’s proposals, which were released earlier this month in his Blueprint for a New Ohio. Generally, if enacted in its current form, there would be an overall reduction in personal income tax, with an increase severance tax, commercial activity tax and sales tax. This article focuses on the severance…
Ohio Gov. John Kasich’s mid-biennium review plan calls for an increase in Ohio oil and gas severance taxes, as proposed in House Bill 472. These increased taxes would fund certain local governmental initiatives and the Ohio Department of Natural Resources. They also would help offset personal income tax cuts outlined in the mid-biennium plan. The current production-based severance tax scheme does not distinguish between production generated by conventional oil and gas wells and production…
The Ohio Department of Taxation recently released draft administrative regulations (the “Regulations”) designed to implement the new Ohio financial institutions tax. The new tax takes effect Jan. 1, 2014 and replaces the corporation franchise tax and dealers in intangible tax, which financial institutions have historically paid in Ohio. The Regulations state that the tax has been designed based upon two fundamental concepts: The tax return will be reported on a consolidated basis at the highest…
The Internal Revenue Service has recently reversed course regarding federal income tax treatment for banks for certain costs associated with OREOs (“other real estate owned”).  The newer guidance should liberalize the ability of banks to take immediate deductions with respect to certain costs associated with OREOS.  The IRS has released a Chief Counsel Memorandum stating that a bank that acquires OREOs through foreclosure or deed-in-lieu with respect to a loan originated by the bank is…
This is the first in a series of blog entries regarding Ohio state and local taxes imposed on oil and gas operations. Oil and gas operators in Ohio currently pay a variety of state and local taxes: Commercial activity tax (CAT) which is a 0.26% excise tax on all Ohio-based gross receipts. The tax is paid by the recipient of the gross receipt—e.g., landowners on rent, drillers on drilling fees, and operators on mineral production.…