Marriam Lin

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Marriam focuses her practice on Intellectual Property law and joined the firm after serving as a Summer Associate. She is a member of the Cortex Innovation Team and Rotation.

Latest Articles

In the past, Plant Variety Protection (PVP) Certificates could only be used to protect plant varieties that reproduce sexually (through seeds) or through tuber propagation. However, the Agricultural Improvement Act of 2018 recently amended the Plant Variety Protection Act (PVPA) by extending protection to plant varieties that reproduce asexually from a single parent (through cutting, grafting, tissue culture, and root division).1…
An important aspect of developing any intellectual property strategy and portfolio is deciding which method of intellectual property protection to pursue based on the advantages and disadvantages of each method. Plants may be protected through utility patents, certificates under the Plant Variety Protection Act (“PVPA”), and plant patents. Each of these methods has their own requirements with various levels of stringency for obtaining a utility patent, certificate, or plant patent, as well as different levels…
Every company, but especially startups, looks for a competitive edge to provide an advantage over other companies. Intellectual property (“IP”) rights and the strategy of how to leverage them may separate a startup from other companies. Because IP can be an essential part of a business and of significant interest to potential investors, startups often enthusiastically disclose their inventions, technology, and other IP when pitching to potential investors or at public events. However, pitching to…
Thinking about telling everyone about your latest and greatest genius idea? You’d better think twice. Telling others about your idea or invention is a “public disclosure” and could bar you from getting a patent. What’s a public disclosure? A public disclosure can be as simple as describing the invention in print, using the invention in public, selling or offering to sell the invention, or making it otherwise available to the public. Common ways for individuals…