Nathan Oleen

Photo of Nathan Oleen

Nathan is a registered patent attorney, representing clients in a full range of intellectual property matters including patent, trade secret, trademark, domain name, unfair competition and copyright matters. He provides business and legal guidance relating to patent and trademark portfolio management, corporate intellectual property policies and technology development and acquisition.

Latest Articles

For the second year in a row, Husch Blackwell was proud to sponsor and participate in Techweek Kansas City. The week long celebration of entrepreneurs, startups and tech gurus was full of great content, networking opportunities and camaraderie. We applaud LaunchKC for gifting 10 deserving innovators with a grant to kick-start or supplement their budding business. Several food and agriculture startups were the recipient of the funding and Kansas City Office Managing Partner Jeff Simon was…
Once again, Husch Blackwell was proud to partner and participate in Techweek Kansas City. We want to congratulate the 10 winners of the LaunchKC grant competition and wish them the best of luck. Our own Jeff Simon served as a judge for the contest, so we know choosing the winners among such a strong cast of candidates was no easy task.…
A startup’s failure to properly protect its intellectual property (IP) prior to presenting its pitch deck or making other outside disclosures (like at @TechweekKC) can sometimes have unintentionally devastating effects.  This is particularly true for IP rights that are not afforded common law protection. While the experience of pitching to angel investors and venture capitalists can be exhilarating, below are four reasons why startups should take a step back and protect their IP prior…
Yesterday, the U.S. Supreme Court issued its decision in the Alice Corp. Pty. Ltd. v. CLS Bank Int’l case, which we have been following throughout previous blog posts.  In its unanimous decision, the Supreme Court held that “abstract ideas” implemented by a computer are not eligible for patent protection.…
In a previous blog post, we queried whether the U.S. Supreme Court would weigh in on the debate over the extent to which software should be patentable.  For at least one case, we now have our answer.  On Friday, the Supreme Court granted certiorari in the in Alice Corp. Pty. Ltd. v. CLS Bank Int’l case.…
The long running and heated debate over the extent to which software should be patentable has recently garnered significant media attention.  The debate is due, in part, to the abstract nature of software patents, the large awards handed down in infringement cases and the fact that software patents are regularly asserted by non-practicing entities (NPEs) against Fortune 500 companies and other large corporations. …