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The letter “W” is an interesting one. Besides being the twenty-third letter in the alphabet, it is the only one having more than one syllable; it has three — unless it is pronounced with two: dub-yah. It is more than a bit ironic that — as a truncated single-letter brand — W, in most cases, has three times the syllables when spoken, as compared to any other single-letter brand. So, while it may be more visually efficient, it clearly lacks auditory efficiency. …
The letter “W” is an interesting one. Besides being the twenty-third letter in the alphabet, it is the only one having more than one syllable; it has three — unless it is pronounced with two: dub-yah. It is more than a bit ironic that — as a truncated single-letter brand — W, in most cases, has three times the syllables when spoken, as compared to any other single-letter brand. So, while it may be more visually efficient, it clearly lacks auditory efficiency. …
The letter “W” is an interesting one. Besides being the twenty-third letter in the alphabet, it is the only one having more than one syllable; it has three — unless it is pronounced with two: dub-yah. It is more than a bit ironic that — as a truncated single-letter brand — W, in most cases, has three times the syllables when spoken, as compared to any other single-letter brand. So, while it may be more visually efficient, it clearly lacks auditory efficiency. …
The letter “W” is an interesting one. Besides being the twenty-third letter in the alphabet, it is the only one having more than one syllable; it has three — unless it is pronounced with two: dub-yah. It is more than a bit ironic that — as a truncated single-letter brand — W, in most cases, has three times the syllables when spoken, as compared to any other single-letter brand. So, while it may be more visually efficient, it clearly lacks auditory efficiency. …
The letter “W” is an interesting one. Besides being the twenty-third letter in the alphabet, it is the only one having more than one syllable; it has three — unless it is pronounced with two: dub-yah. It is more than a bit ironic that — as a truncated single-letter brand — W, in most cases, has three times the syllables when spoken, as compared to any other single-letter brand. So, while it may be more visually efficient, it clearly lacks auditory efficiency. …
My son snapped this photo during a recent family trip to Washington, D.C. It almost has become a hobby for him to capture people in the act of ignoring a sign’s specific request or doing exactly what a sign purports to forbid. While some retreated from the water in the World War II Memorial when they saw a camera pointed in their direction, it appears, others just can’t help themselves, despite having actual knowledge of the opposite instruction:…
My son snapped this photo during a recent family trip to Washington, D.C. It almost has become a hobby for him to capture people in the act of ignoring a sign’s specific request or doing exactly what a sign purports to forbid. While some retreated from the water in the World War II Memorial when they saw a camera pointed in their direction, it appears, others just can’t help themselves, despite having actual knowledge of the opposite instruction:…
Welcome to another addition of Non-Verbal Logos that truly stand alone (without words). Other additions here and here. The latter was generously republished by David Airey. So, as we’ve said before, pictures can say a thousand words, but which logo doesn’t belong here:                                    My answer below the jump.…