Family & Divorce

As we adjust to “stay-at-home” orders in the midst of the COVID-19 crisis, we are all learning how to utilize technology to continue our work and our lives when we are not able to be physically present in the world. Online mediation, which has been gaining popularity in recent years, is a dispute resolution process that utilizes online video conferencing platforms to allow parties and a neutral mediator to “meet” remotely for sessions. Online mediation…
The Forensic Accounting Deskbook by Miles Mason, Sr. JD, CPA, published by the ABA Family Law Section A lifestyle analysis can alter the relative negotiating strength of the parties to a divorce.  For more information, see Lifestyle Analysis | Alimony in Tennessee Divorce Law. There is an entire chapter devoted to Lifestyle Analysis in The Forensic Accounting Deskbook: A Practical Guide to Financial Investigation and Analysis for Family Lawyers, Second Edition, authored by…
With the rise of the COVID-19 pandemic, Des Moines, Iowa schools are currently closed through April 13. As of the date of this blog, it is unknown whether state-wide school closures will be extended indefinitely for the school year. If school never returns to session, does that mean summer visitation starts early? What about a visitation order that permits parents to have a Sunday overnight if there is no school the next day? Does that…
Tennessee alimony modification case summary and special needs child. Christopher Maurice Kibbe v. Mary Carolyn Kibbe The mother and father in this Washington County, Tennessee, case were divorced in 2014.  They were the parents of two children, one of whom was disabled.  The father was granted 124 days per year of co-parenting time with the disabled daughter, who was in need of constant care and supervision. The father was a commercial pilot, although he was…
In this BuzzFeed article, Hello Divorce CEO Erin Levine offers advice to co-parents navigating their way through coronavirus. There’s a legal answer and a mama bear answer (“mama” for purposes of this = gender-neutral). The legal answer is that parents that live near each other should probably continue to exchange their kids. At least that’s what most government websites are saying. The mama bear answer is go with your gut. Check yourself — are you…
Often, spouses must declare, or claim, what they earn. Very often, they earn significantly more according to their own tax returns, W-2s, 10-99s, and current pay stubs. There are even more documents available from which to compare claimed vs. documented income. The Forensic Accounting Deskbook by Miles Mason, Sr. JD, CPA, published by the ABA Family Law Section Miles Mason, Sr. JD, CPA is the author of The Forensic Accounting Deskbook: A Practical Guide to