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The American Bar Association recently passed a new standard for accreditation for law schools, mandating that to maintain accreditation, at least 75% of graduates of a law school must pass the bar within two years. If they don’t, it doesn’t mean immediate loss of accreditation but the ABA will presumably monitor steps law schools take to fix the problem. There is an excellent analysis of the ABA standard by Steven Chung in Above the Law
The Law School Admissions Council announced awhile back that July’s LSAT would be the last to be administered, at least partially, in the old pencil-and-paper format. The announcement was made without a lot of fuss but the LSAT industry immediately posted a bunch of blogs that opined on how important the shift was and largely tried to move up potential customers’ test date by instilling a little bit of fear about the new format. As…
There’s a good conversation in a recent ABA Journal on making a decision about whether law school—and more, the practice of law—is right for you.  The featured interviewees, Nicole Black and Heather Morse, talk about most of the relevant factors, which I’ve been talking about on this blog for years, and were motivators to open Advise-In Solutions—among them potential debt load, changes in the legal market, always having Plans B and C.  The latter is…
The LSAT is now being administered six times a year rather than four.  In part, this is to try to head off the inroads that the GRE is making into the Law School Admission Council’s territory.  I’ve talked about the LSAT/GRE debate, which you can review here and here. I haven’t talked about the impact of additional LSAT dates on law school admissions, partly because the expansion is new and no one really knows. …
One reason regulation gets a bad name is because of regulatory hypocrisy.  The American Bar Association’s logo banners: “Defending Liberty Pursuing Justice.”  I guess you have to ask “for whom?” The ABA will bring to a full vote in August its proposal—approved by relevant committees of, well, the ABA—to “eliminate the requirement of a ‘valid and reliable test’ as part of a law school’s admissions process.” I’ve criticized the ABA’s lack of oversight over the…
Tuesday was my wedding anniversary.  It occurred to me that I have been helping clients with law school admission, financial aid and LSAT preparation for longer than I have been married.  Both seem shorter than they’ve been. I’ve been helping prospective law students for more than 20 years.  There are companies that are have been around longer but mostly they change out staff every year or two.  Most college and university pre-law advisors have been…
During the past year, my clients and I have achieved truly outstanding LSAT results (to say nothing of admissions and financial aid results that come partly from their LSAT results and partly as the result of putting together outstanding application packages and admissions/financial aid strategies). From start to finish, my clients have averaged increased scores of over 13 points and over 42 percentiles.  That means that, on average, they have passed nearly half of everyone…
Karen Sloan recently published a helpful summary of the debate between the LSAT and GRE for law school admissions.  As of now, 17 law schools indicate they will accept a GRE score rather than an LSAT score, and more may well follow. What is clear is why:  law schools want to maintain their admissions numbers (read: their revenue) and want to have maximum flexibility to do so without taking a law school “rankings” hit…
There’s a terrific piece by Jill Backer in the New York Law Journal that every prospective law student and law school advisor should read carefully.  It is a brief and useful examination of the various metrics that are used by law schools and others for the reporting data on employment for students coming out of law school.  I won’t summarize or repeat what the article says here but the basic point is that no one…
In my last post, I framed the LSAT as a mental athletic contest.  It is, simple as that.  Your objective isn’t just understanding the material on the LSAT, it’s also performing when you have to perform.  As I said there, most LSAT prep programs don’t spend any attention on the second of these, and that’s one reason why people’s scores often fall on test day—not just a little bit, but dramatically. I’ve had people…