Ball Janik LLP

On December 18, 2018, the United States District Court for the Middle District of Florida held that the “property damage” requirement and the “Damage to Your Work” and “Exterior Finishing System and Stucco” exclusions were insufficient to relieve an insurer of its duty to defend its insured in a construction-defect action.…
Project owners and contractors often face challenges when defective building materials are used during construction. Bad building products can throw an entire construction project off kilter and, of course, can lead to litigation. Questions for the lawyer can abound. Is the contractor to blame for using the bad product? What if the project owner or architect selected the product? What about the manufacturer? Isn’t it responsible? While these questions are important, it’s often the details…
Last month’s Oregon Supreme Court decision in Ransom v. Radiology Specialists of the Northwest, 363 Or 552 (2018) will likely have far-reaching impacts on how discovery is conducted in construction defect cases in Oregon. Ransom involved a plaintiff’s claim for alleged medical negligence case against two of the plaintiff’s former radiologists for alleged failure to properly read her imaging scans, which the plaintiff further alleged led to misdiagnosing her cancer as Stage II instead of…
Many school districts and other public agencies are considering using a special process for capital projects, by engaging the contractor through the construction manager / general contractor (“CM/GC”) method. Use of this procurement method requires several extra steps that are not applicable to the standard bid process. Special care must be taken in its implementation. Advantages A key concept behind CM/GC procurement is that the contractor is selected early in the design process, before the…
Construction defects plague many buildings in Florida, leading to lawsuits against developers and contractors. Seasoned developers have tried placing limits on their liability in a variety of ways, including inserting provisions in associations’ governing documents to limit associations’ and owners’ ability to bring a lawsuit against the developer. While developers have been creative in coming up with ways to limit liability exposure, this article focuses on what developers may not include in the governing documents…
As anyone who is taking the time to read this blog probably knows, the American Institute of Architects (AIA) construction contract forms are omnipresent. Which means you also probably know that in April 2017 the AIA released an update to its A201 general conditions form, last updated in 2007. While many of the changes were discussed, researched, written and lectured about last summer, including by me, I’ve recently started to field a lot of questions…
On April 3, 2018, Oregon Governor Kate Brown signed into law HB 4144, which eases licensing requirements for construction contractors, especially those in rural areas. Under the new Construction Contractors Board rules, an individual with at least eight years of experience in the construction industry may apply for a new residential contractor’s license without having to complete the previously required training. Applicants under the new rules must still pass the CCB licensing exam, and must…
Property owners and contractors alike dread at least one phase of the building process more than others: permitting. For many, obtaining a building permit or getting a set of building plans approved by the local building department can seem more like a trip to the dentist than a step toward a new house or commercial building. Long lines, complicated forms, and expenses can be enough to take a toll on even the most seasoned permit…