Harris Bricken

Harris Bricken is a boutique international law firm with lawyers in Seattle, Portland, San Francisco, Barcelona and Beijing. Our focus is on small and medium sized businesses that operate internationally and on multinational companies that require specialized legal assistance.

We have lawyers licensed in China, Russia, Spain, Germany, Australia and various states in America. Our language capabilities include Chinese, French, German, Japanese, Korean, Russian, and Spanish.

Though we are small in size, we are big in reputation, both for our legal knowledge and for the relationships we establish with our clients.

I recently relocated to Washington, D.C. to join our East Coast practice group and have been inundated with inquiries surrounding the legal framework of recreational cannabis (i.e., marijuana and hemp) in the nation’s capital. So, in light of this overwhelming interest, I thought I’d briefly summarize this issue for our readers. Marijuana In November 2014, D.C. residents overwhelmingly approved Initiative 71, a ballot measure that legalized the possession and cultivation of small amounts of…
Co-Authors: Steven Rudmann + Nadja Vietz It is a great time to acquire vacation property in Spain, but important to thoroughly understand the legal and tax implications. In early 2020, market prices for vacation properties in Spain were rising, as they steadily had been since 2015. Then in March, COVID-19 hit the country hard. A long lockdown followed, during which tourism fell to zero. Airports and popular tourist destinations resembled ghost towns. The pandemic’s impact…
Virtually any time that there are transactions involving cannabis company mergers, cannabis company acquisitions, or cannabis real estate sales, and in many cases involving the sale of assets of a cannabis company, the parties are likely to encounter a concept called “closing” in their purchase agreements. Closing isn’t necessarily unique to purchase and sale situations and can be happen in other types of contracts as well, but for the purposes of this post, I’ll focus…
A foreign company entering Mexico must decide on the form of business entity it will use to conduct its Mexico operations. There are three options: Representative office, which cannot enter into legal transactions in Mexico but can promote the products or services of the foreign company, or conduct activities such as market research; Branch office, which is permitted to sign contracts with Mexican counterparts, as well as receive revenue from local entities, but whose actions…
Here at the Canna Law Blog, we had intended to start our series on the real estate implications of the Marijuana Regulation and Taxation Act (MRTA) with a discussion of issues faced by each license type. But after reading The New York Times’ recent article on the real estate “rush” caused by the MRTA, we felt compelled to address some statements that could mislead prospective applicants when evaluating their license options. As a brief refresher,…
In recent weeks, I have spoken to several entrepreneurs interested in growing cannabis in Africa for exportation to the United States and other markets. It is not hard to see their attraction to the idea: The areas in question have suitable climates to grow cannabis, while inputs such as land and labor are relatively inexpensive. There is still a way to go before it becomes a straightforward to import hemp to the United States as…