Rich Cassidy Law

Our firm represents people, not businesses or institutions. We focus on personal injury litigation and employment law. We represent people who have been injured due to the fault of others and employees in disputes with their employers or former employers.

Why? We want to make our living doing work that is worthwhile. Early in my career, I represented all sides in many kinds of disputes. But I simply didn’t find it satisfying to represent insurance companies and big businesses. It is true that businesses must pay attention to the bottom line. But many companies don’t seem to care about anything else. They just want to resolve claims as cheaply as they can. For them, people’s troubles are just balance sheet issues. Serving that narrow way of seeing the world is not how I want to spend my life.

Injured people really need help. You have medical bills to pay. You have lost wages and earnings. You have been in pain and may still be in pain. You may have disabilities. You may have suffered the loss of a loved one.

Some employers treat their employees well. But many do not. Some employers seem to ignore the fact that hard working, loyal employees depend on their salaries and benefits to provide for their families and themselves.

Justice is not given; it is achieved. Without help from a competent, experienced lawyer, you may get nothing, or whatever pittance the insurance companies or employers choose to give you.

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Complaints are Opportunities I read Lee Rosen’s email newsletter, Friday File. It’s a great place for practical advice on how to run a law practice. You can subscribe here. In a recent edition, Lee described a traumatic experience with his dentist, who lost control of his drill and punctured Lee’s tonsil. Two weeks of painful healing ensued. Lee did not complain, the dentist did not apologize, and Lee quickly changed dentists. In retrospect, he realizes…
November No sun — no moon! No morn — no noon — No dawn — no dusk — no proper time of day. No warmth, no cheerfulness, no healthful ease, No comfortable feel in any member — No shade, no shine, no butterflies, no bees, No fruits, no flowers, no leaves, no birds! — November! I have always thought of November as the bleakest month. That’s particularly true here in Vermont, where the leaves have…
Here is more on that federal criminal trial described in my September 28, 2020 Post: How do we Resume Jury Trials in Vermont It’s based on remarks made by Chief United States District Judge Geoffrey Crawford today at a Federal Bar Association CLE on Qui Tam litigation. The Judge points out that the case was a quick and simple one, but still involved over 40 participants. He noted that the lawyers could not be kept…
Forty-Two Years Ago When I awoke last Friday morning, I realized that it was the 42nd anniversary of my first full day of work as a lawyer. I was not yet admitted to the bar, but as a fledgling judicial law clerk I did not need to be. Remembering that anniversary flooded my mind with recollections of my first boss, the Honorable Robert W. Larrow, who was for 7 years an Associate Justice of the…
The Justice System is Struggling to Adapt to the COVID – 19 Pandemic Here we sit in the seventh month of the COVID–19 pandemic. When will it end? No one knows. Optimists thought that it would end with warm weather. They were wrong. Now they think a vaccine is on the horizon. Maybe. More realistic observers suggest a successful vaccine won’t be administered broadly enough to bring the pandemic under control until late 2021. And…
If there is one thing that almost all lawyers do, it is negotiate. Business lawyers do it. Litigators do it do it. Real estate lawyers do it. I suspect that even patent lawyers do it. Most of us think we do it well. Particularly after you have been practicing for a long time, you feel confident about the things you do over and over. And you are probably right. If you’ve been a practicing lawyer…
Over the past few months, lawyers around the world have had to adjust how they practice their profession, and legislatures and the judiciary have had to adapt to make access to the legal system as safe as possible. Historically, documents that needed notarization required the notary to be present in the same room as the signer. In recent months, acting under 26 V.S.A. § 5364, the Vermont Secretary of State has adopted Emergency Rules permitting…
The Practice of Law Changed Irrevocably this Month. The coronavirus pandemic has launched a worldwide, mass experiment in practice of law by remote means. Of course, this isn’t wholly new. All of us who have been in practice long enough have been seen our practices change a great deal since the internet became widespread. And many lawyers have adopted digitally enabled techniques to enhance their practices in very significant ways. A few have been practicing…
If you use mediation, it’s useful to step back once and a while and think about why it works to be sure that you’re taking full advantage of what it has to offer. (If you don’t use it: “why not?”) As an advocate, I’ve used mediation to help resolve cases since 1989, and have made serving as a mediator a part of my practice since at least 1994. I think there are five dynamics that power mediation.First,…
Thinking in Bets: Making Smarter Decisions When You Don’t Have All the Facts By Annie Duke (Portfolio/Penguin: New York 2018). As a lawyer who strives to give clients objective advice, reading Thinking in Bets was a refreshing challenge. I am fortunate that my own practice experience has been diverse. Although my focus is now on representing plaintiffs and work as a mediator, I carry with me some of the thought processes I learned when I…