Glassdoor, the website described as “Yelp for workplaces,” claims that 83% of job seekers in the United States read its reviews. For the uninitiated, Glassdoor is a website where anonymous employees and former employees comment on a company’s workplace – sharing information on topics such as salary levels, workplace policies, office politics, and much more. View Full Post
A California appellate court recently ruled that Tinder’s age-based pricing strategy violated the state’s Unruh Civil Rights Act, which broadly outlaws discrimination based on sex, race, sexual orientation, age, and other classes. California’s Second District Court of Appeal in Los Angeles reversed the trial court’s dismissal of a class action brought by a putative group of customers over 30 years of age, who claim Tinder improperly charged them more for a premium service than it did users in the 18-29 age range. View Full Post
Consider the following scenario: your organization holds an annual meeting with all Research & Development employees for the purpose of having an open discussion between thought leaders and R&D regarding product-development capabilities. This year’s meeting is scheduled outside the United States and next year’s will be within the U.S. View Full Post
Lawyers have a deservedly bad reputation when it comes to technology and its use and adoption. But one group of lawyers is attacking the issue head on. The Federation of Defense and Corporate Counsel, (of which I am a proud member) is making efforts to be sure its members have state of the art technological tools and skills to better try cases and persuade juries. View Full Post
The Bank of England (BoE) has published a consultation paper on a new rule for central counterparties (CCPs) relating to incident reporting. The BoE is proposing to make a new rule relating to incident reporting, which will formalise the requirement for CCPs to notify the BoE of certain incidents having an impact on their information technology systems. View Full Post
Driscoll’s using new technology to improve flavor, food safety Agriculture companies are always striving to produce better-tasting, longer-lasting, safer fruits and vegetables, which diminish in value the minute they go from stalk or vine to market. Driscoll’s, a $3.5 billion provider of berry plants, is turning to emerging technologies, such as artificial intelligence, machine learning, the internet of things (IoT) and blockchain, to produce hardier plants and fortify its supply chain, which includes traceability. View Full Post
On February 8, 2018, the Federal Government announced the first reading of Bill C-69: An Act to enact the Impact Assessment Act and the Canadian Energy Regulator Act, to amend the Navigation Protection Act and to make consequential amendments to other Acts (Bill C-69). View Full Post
As the Eagles readied to celebrate the franchise’s first Vince Lombardi trophy, an unlikely candidate basked in the glow of being declared the game’s Most Valuable Player. Surely it was Nick Foles who, on his way to upsetting one of the NFL’s elite franchises threw and caught a touchdown in the same big game, was the true MVP. View Full Post
In 2008, a scandal rocked New York’s process-serving industry. An investigation by New York City’s Department of Consumer Affairs of the high default rate in consumer credit cases found that disreputable process-serving companies were never actually serving process, but instead effectively tossing the papers in the sewer and filing false affidavits of service. View Full Post
Lyft recently confirmed that it is investigating whether its employees were accessing its customer database without appropriate authorization to obtain personal information, including rides taken by Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg.  The investigation was announced less than six months after Uber entered into a Federal Trade Commission (FTC) consent order to resolve allegations of similar behavior by its own employees. View Full Post
Is the Portland area’s regional housing crisis being made better or worse by state and local land use regulations? Gerald Mildner, Ph.D, an associate professor of real estate and finance at Portland State University, and the academic director of the University’s Center for Real Estate, would say, “worse.” According to Dr. View Full Post
Consider a few scenarios: An employee has been injured on the job and unexpectedly fails a post-accident drug test, testing positive for opioids. What do you do? An employee comes into your office, closes the door, and confides in you that she is battling an addiction to opioids and needs help. View Full Post
On January 18, 2018, the Small Business Credit Availability Act was introduced in the U.S. Senate and referred to the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs.  The Act would amend the Investment Company Act of 1940 to change certain requirements relating to the capital structure of business development companies (BDCs) and direct the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) to revise certain rules to allow BDCs to take advantage of securities offering and communication exemptions currently available to other companies. View Full Post
This past weekend, Scottsdale, Arizona police used new drone detection technology at the Waste Management Phoenix Open to keep attendees (and players) safe. Sergeant Ben Hoster said, “Drones are becoming so inexpensive and so popular, we are getting ahead of this technology,” by linking up with Dedrone (an anti-drone solutions company) and Aerial Armor (a security solutions for drone intrusions business). View Full Post