Brexit Legal

Legal and Public Policy Considerations of the EU Referendum

Lord, what fools these mortals be – Shakespeare, Midsummer Night’s Dream Last Friday should have been the day the UK left the EU.  Instead the Westminster Parliament, in a rare Friday sitting, rejected the Withdrawal Agreement component of the Prime Minister’s Brexit deal by a substantial majority. What has happened? Parliament has imposed “indicative votes” on possible Brexit outcomes on a reluctant Government, but then failed to produce a majority in favour of any outcome…
Summary Government strategy thrown into disarray by Speaker’s ruling that Parliament cannot vote on the May withdrawal deal again The threat of no deal Brexit on 29 March has been reduced, but not entirely removed The threat of no deal Brexit at some point in the future is still there, but remains small Brexit will almost certainly be delayed, at least until May / June, but more likely for longer Longer delay would be likely…
Where are we now? The UK’s progress towards leaving the European Union has been a tortuous and turbulent affair. It has been marked by Prime Minister Theresa May’s Government suffering repeated heavy defeats in Parliament, which would normally have led to a change of policy if not of Government, but carrying on with its Brexit stance unchanged. So you could be forgiven for assuming that a series of votes initiated by backbenchers at the end…
Brexit is scheduled to become effective at the end of 29 March 2019 and will take place either with a Withdrawal Agreement or without one having been entered into between the UK and the EU-27. At this point in time it is possible that the Article 50 TEU notice is withdrawn by the UK Government. Whether the Brexit Date 29 March 2019 is postponed upon application of the UK and agreed with the unanimous…
With continuing uncertainty, there is still a lack of clarity on what the final Brexit arrangements will look like. Many companies have been planning for the implications of Brexit for some time, whereas some still need to consider how Brexit may affect their operations. Both the UK government and the EU are encouraging businesses to prepare for the possibility of a no-deal Brexit. Regardless of size, plans need to be put in place so that…
Over the period since the rejection of the Withdrawal Agreement, the Prime Minister’s tactic has been to try to bring the pro-Brexit wing of the Conservative Party, and the Northern Ireland Democratic Unionists, back on side.  No.10 appear to have been successful in whittling the pro-Brexit wing’s nominal resistance to the Withdrawal Agreement (which was very wide ranging at the time of the vote on 15th Jan) down to just the Northern Ireland backstop –…
EU citizens and their family members may now apply under the EU Settlement Scheme as part of a public test phase, running from 21 January 2019. Register now for our Brexit Immigration webinar on EU Settlement and the White Paper at 12.30pm on Thursday 24 January for practical guidance on how to support your affected employees through the application process.…
As it stands, the UK will cease to be a member state of the European Union (EU) as of 30 March 2019. On 24 November 2018, the UK and the EU agreed to enter into a Withdrawal Agreement (the Withdrawal Agreement). The Withdrawal Agreement provides in Article 127 (6) that during a transition period from 30 March 2019 to 31 December 2020 (the Transition Period), any reference in EU law to a member state of…
As it stands, the UK will cease to be a member state of the European Union as of 30 March 2019. On 24 November 2018 the UK and the EU agreed to enter into a Withdrawal Agreement. The Withdrawal Agreement provides in Article 127 (6) that during a transition period from 30 March 2019 to 31 December 2020 any reference in EU law to a Member State of the EU shall include the UK and…
The Government has finally published the delayed Immigration White Paper. Here’s a brief summary of the key proposals and concerns, what employers should do next and how our dedicated Immigration team can help. As one of the fundamental challenges facing UK businesses post-Brexit, it is really important that you have your say on the proposals. There will be a 12-month consultation process so there is time to think about your response but please register your