Capital Markets Litigation

Litigation News for the Global Financial Community

Recently, investors and economists have focused increased attention on bond market yield curves, which have proven to be a compelling predictor of an upcoming economic recession. The yield curve is the measure of the difference between short-term and long-term interest rates on government bonds.  In a healthy economy, interest rates on long-term (typically, ten-year) bonds are generally higher than rates on short-term (often, two-year) bonds.  This rate increase from short-term to long-term bonds creates a…
Investors in a private cryptocurrency firm brought a class action securities lawsuit against the firm itself, Latium Network, Inc. (Latium) and individually against Latium’s founder and CEO David Johnson and co-founder and chief commercial officer Matthew Carden. The lawsuit alleges that the defendants are subject to strict liability for violating Section 5 of the Securities Act of 1933 by offering and selling unregistered securities in the form of LatiumX tokens. According to the complaint, filed…
On Thursday, March 29, Barclays Capital Inc. and several of its affiliates (together, Barclays)–as well as two former Barclays executives–agreed to settle a three-year Department of Justice (DOJ) investigation concerning Barclays’ marketing and sale of residential mortgage-backed securities (RMBS) between 2005 and 2007. The lawsuit was commenced by the United States Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of New York in December 2016. The action, filed in the United States District Court for the Eastern…
In December 2014, the credit risk retention rule, 79 Fed. Reg. 77,601 (the credit risk retention rule), was adopted pursuant to Section 941 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (Dodd-Frank). The credit risk retention rule requires any “securitizer” of asset-backed securities (or other related parties) to acquire and retain either (i) 5 percent of the face amount of each class of notes issued by the collateralized loan obligation (CLO), (ii) notes…
Foreign securities class actions have been on the rise since the U.S. Supreme Court’s 2010 decision in Morrison v. National Australia Bank, Ltd., which held that federal securities laws apply only to securities purchased on domestic exchanges. 561 U.S. 247 (2010). Investors are increasingly turning to foreign forums to recoup losses associated with securities purchased or sold outside of the U.S. In addition to differences in substantive and procedural law, certain foreign jurisdictions have laws…
In the past few years, institutional investors and others seeking to enforce their rights in court have been hit with several negative legal decisions concerning statutes of limitation issues. In 2015, the New York Court of Appeals held in ACE Securities that a claim for breaches of representations and warranties in an RMBS contract accrues when the representations are made, not when a sponsor refuses to cure or repurchase the breaching mortgage loans, rendering certain contractual…
Last week, U.S. District Judge Katherine B. Forrest of the Southern District of New York reinstated a failure-to-notify claim brought by plaintiff Deutsche Bank National Trust Company (the trustee) against defendant Morgan Stanley Mortgage Capital Holdings LLC (“Morgan Stanley”). This notification claim is distinct from the trustee’s claim for breach of contract—based on Morgan Stanley’s alleged breaches of the agreements governing the residential mortgage-backed security (“RMBS”) transaction—and concerns Morgan Stanley’s failure to inform the trustee…
Last month, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit upheld a 2014 ruling holding issuers of residential mortgage-backed securities (RMBS) liable for securities fraud. In the opinion by U.S. Circuit Judge Richard C. Wesley, the court emphasized the policies underlying the passage of the Securities Act of 1933 and related state laws, which aim to protect securities purchasers by imposing a duty on sellers of securities to disclose all material information before such public…
On July 12, 2017, the Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS) and the Federal Housing Finance Agency (“FHFA”) announced an agreement to settle claims arising out of RBS’s sale of allegedly faulty residential mortgage-backed securities (“RMBS”).  RBS will pay $5.5 billion to settle the claims. The FHFA, as conservator of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, filed a lawsuit against RBS in 2011 in the United States District Court for the District of Connecticut, alleging that RBS…
On May 1 and 3, UBS Securities LLC and Credit Suisse Securities USA LLC announced settlements of significant claims brought against them by the National Credit Union Administration (“NCUA”), the federal agency serving as liquidation agent for credit unions that folded during the economic crisis. Credit Suisse will pay $400 million and UBS $445 million to settle the NCUA claims. The NCUA brought RMBS fraud claims against Credit Suisse, alleging that the bank made false and…