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From 2013-2020, alongside Jameson Dempsey, Alan deLevie, Wendy Knox Everette, and John Chadwell, I co-organized a meetup called DC Legal Hackers in Washington D.C. When Jameson and I (both New York City ex-pats) met up in D.C. to discuss recreating the NYC Legal Hackers meetup community I don’t either of us anticipated how big the community would get or what it would mean to our lives. (There are now chapters in over 200 cities on…
Le Hackies 6 (2019) Winners Le Hackie Company of the Year: Community.Lawyer Le Hackie Organization of the Year: Select Committee on the Modernization of Congress Legal Hacker of the Year: Jonathan Pyle Legal Hacks of the Year: Actionable Auditing:Investigating the Impact of Publicly Naming Biased Performance Results ofCommercial AI Products (Inioluwa Deborah Raji & Joy Buolamwini) Binding Operational Directive 20-01 (draft), Develop and Publish a Vulnerability Disclosure Policy (Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) at…
Le Hackies 5 (2018) Winners Le Hackie Company of the Year: Impowerus.com Le Hackie Organization of the Year: Center for Democracy and Technology Legal Hacker of the Year: Carl Malamud Legal Hacks of the Year: Article One (Open Gov Foundation) Case.law Access Project (Adam Zeigler; Harvard Innovation Library) Canting Tribe NDA (Kyle Mitchell) Computers and the Law (American University Washington College of Law) Justicetech.info (Jason Tashea and Lindsey Barrett) Learned Hands (David Colarusso and Margaret…
Le Hackies 4 (2017) Winners Le Hackie Company of the Year: Mozilla Le Hackie Organization of the Year: Georgetown University Law Center Legal Hacker of the Year: Brad Heath Legal Hacks of the Year: Computer Programming For Lawyers (Paul Ohm, Jonathan Frankle, Ethan Plail, et al) “Digital Deceit” (Dipayan Ghosh, Ben Scott) Digital Security Training (Matt Mitchell, Alexandra Ulsh, Shauna Dillavou, Wendy, Eric Mill) “Evaluating The Effects of Police-worn Body Camera” (The Lab @ DC’s…
You should research current digital security best practices based on your individual threat model. But for posterity (and insight into organizing training sessions), check out our materials from our Digital Security Training with ACLU DC and Georgetown Law’s Institute for Technology Law & Policy in August 2017. See also Georgetown Law’s Institute for Technology Law & Policy’s blog post. These materials serve as learning aids only and are not legal advice. Please note some…
Le Hackies 3 (2016) Winners Le Hackie Company of the Year: Upturn Le Hackie Organization of the Year: TechCongress Legal Hacker of the Year: Kat Duffy & Bill Hunt Legal Hacks of the Year: Computer Security Tools and Concepts for Lawyers (Kendra Albert) Every CRS Report (Daniel Schuman and Joshua Tauberer) Law Journal Openness Analysis (Sarah Glassmeyer) Legal Informatics Research Network / Democratic Deliberation Dissertation (RC Richards) MD Expungement (Matthew Stubenberg) Open Beta/DATA Act (Becky…
Le Hackie 2 (2015) Winners Le Hackie Company of the Year: YouTube (Google) for its Fair Use Protection Program Le Hackie Organization of the Year: Open Technology Institute Legal Hacker of the Year: Kirsten Gullickson Legal Hacks of the Year: Clean Slate (Briane Knight) CommonForm (Kyle Mitchell and Ansel Halliburton) Councilmatic (Datamade) DC Council Modern Codification (David Greisen) E-regulations (CFPB, Jen Ehlers and/or Will Sullivan of 18F) Footnote Citation Analyzer(Wendy Knox-Everette) GitHub Licensing (Ben…
Le Hackies 1 (2014) Winners Le Hackie Company of the Year: Fastcase Le Hackie Organization of the Year: Free Law Founders Legal Hacker of the Year: Dave Zvenyach Legal Hacks of the Year: Capitol Bells (Ted Henderson) Coding for Lawyers (Dave Zvenyach) @CongressEdits (Ed Summers) Contact Congress (Electronic Frontier Foundation, Sunlight Foundation, and 150 civic hackers) Free Law Project — Oral Arguments (Brian Carver and Michael Lissner) Legal Citation Hackathon (DC Legal Hackers with contributions…
In April 2012, Phil Weiss and Warren Allen hosted the BLIP Legal Hackathon, an event that would prove foundational for the Legal Hackers community. At the event, the organizers defined a powerful mission statement: “The goal is to morph and evolve the law on one hand to better serve technologists, enterprises and society, but also harness technology so that lawyers can better service their clients.” Understood in this way, “Legal Hackers” is about more…