The Bloomberg Editorial Board recently published an article entitled “Too Many Workers Are Trapped By Non-Competes” arguing that the practice of requiring relatively low-wage and/or unskilled workers to sign non-compete agreements is a drag on the economy and is contributing to wage stagnation. The article contends that restricting unspecialized workers’ ability to freely change jobs hinders competition in the marketplace and decreases worker bargaining power. An economist could best say whether the article’s assessment of…
With the continued rise of the #MeToo movement, New York has taken the reins as one of the leaders in combating sexual harassment in the workplace.  All employers who have employees located in New York state must now provide sexual harassment training to all employees at least once a year.  New York joins California, Connecticut, Delaware, and Maine as states requiring sexual harassment training.  This requirement applies to employers of all sizes, and employers must…
The National Labor Relations Board is signaling yet another change to the joint employer test in its recent issuance of a new proposed rule.  The Board has waffled back and forth on this important issue recently, creating a lot of uncertainty for employers.  Here’s an explanation of what has been going on and what is likely to come. Remind Me: What’s Been Going On? Many of you will remember the Board’s 2015 decision in Browning-Ferris…
On September 7, 2018, the U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics announced the most recent employment numbers for the United States.  As of August, total payroll employment had increased by 201,000, and the unemployment rate remained at 3.9%.  The positive trend has also impacted an often-overlooked category of potential employees:  disabled adults of prime working age. Employment for this group has been steadily rising in recent years.  For example, the Bureau of Labor…
Since the federal government vowed to take strong measures against employers and unauthorized foreign workers under the “Buy American Hire American” (BAHA) Executive Order, we have seen an increase in the number of worksite enforcement visits and arrests.  U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) has increased its workforce by four to five times, and as a result, there has been a dramatic increase in the number of worksite enforcement visits.  A review of this increase…
Employers and consumer reporting agencies beware: a change to a commonly used form required by the Fair Credit Reporting Act (“FCRA”) becomes effective on September 21, 2018, and the price of non-compliance could be class action lawsuits. On September 21, 2018, the Economic Growth, Regulatory Relief and Consumer Protection Act’s changes to the FCRA Summary of Rights form will take effect. The Act requires new language to be added to the form explaining a consumer’s…
Employers are well aware of the requirement to post various notices from the EEOC, DOL, and other acronym-bearing state and federal agencies.  Unfortunately, many employers have a “post it and forget it” mentality and fail to regularly update those posters and required notices. These agencies, however, are often issuing updated required postings and employers who fail to heed those requirements can be assessed fines and potentially face criminal charges.  In California alone, there were 40…
Refusing to serve a patron is a hot topic right now, and it is not something any employer should take lightly. When recently asked about this issue by Thomson Reuters, partner Seth Ford and staff attorney Matt Anderson outlined the do’s and don’ts for a refusal of service policy. The main point is that employees themselves should have very little leeway to make such decisions on their own or based on their own opinions, save…
A recent ruling by the California Supreme Court could have lasting consequences for timekeeping practices and the payment of wages for hourly employees. In the case of Troester v. Starbucks Corp., the court ruled on July 26, 2018 that Starbucks had to pay the plaintiff for time spent on regular, off-the-clock tasks. The court found that, at least in this particular case, plaintiff’s claims for unpaid wages were not exempt from payment under the FLSA…
Last week, I attended the annual American Immigration Lawyers Association Conference in San Francisco with 3,500+ others from all over the country (and some from outside the U.S.).  The consensus from the conference reiterated that the immigration landscape is shifting rapidly, and employers must adapt to those significant changes.  Here are some of the most notable changes: Imputing constructive knowledge to employers The government is conducting more site visits, audits, and raids to go after…