Journal of Business & Intellectual Property Law

The JBIPL Blog offers a forum for our Editors and Staff to expand our coverage of developments in both business and IP law. The Blog will provide short entries analyzing current cases, trends and issues in business and IP law. The Blog has won the The Expert Institute's 2015 and 2016 Best Legal Blog Contest for Education and Law School Blogs.

Latest from Journal of Business & Intellectual Property Law - Page 2

By: Haodi Dong Recently, a growing number of companies are choosing to go public by merging with Special Purpose Acquisition Companies (“SPACs”) instead of going through a traditional Initial Public Offerings (“IPOs”). This post discusses current SPAC regulations and explores why investors should think carefully before investing in SPACs. The Year of SPAC In 2020, 248 SPAC IPOs raised over $82 billion, which accounted for 55% of total U.S. IPOs and 46% of total…
By: Joshua Durham  Wyoming’s so-called “slack-jawed” Decentralized Autonomous Organizations “(DAO”) Supplement bill will take effect July 2021. It grants DAOs the opportunity to register as limited liability companies (“LLCs”) in the state. This bill is fitting for the “Cowboy State,” not only because its nickname evinces the “wild west” ethos around the emerging cryptoverse, but also because Wyoming first pioneered the LLC, a once novel business organization. Perhaps even more fitting for this…
By: Katherine Brock  Nearly eight years ago, fast food employees in Seattle marched out of work and into the streets, launching a strike—and ultimately a movement—for a $15 minimum wage. Within two months, the strike spread to more than fifty cities across the country, forcing many restaurants to close temporarily amid cries for higher wages and the right to organize. Today, Seattle residents enjoy a minimum wage between $15 and $16.69 an hour depending on…
By: Evan Federico In August of 2020, Citigroup Inc. inadvertently wired almost $900 million to a group of hedge funds to pay off a syndicated loan for the struggling multinational cosmetics company Revlon, Inc. However, the money had come from Citigroup–not Revlon–and neither Revlon nor Citigroup intended to pay the loan off. Citigroup was merely the administrative agent for the loan, meant to collect and distribute interest payments, manage amortization schedules, and provide other…
By: Katherine Brock  At the start of the twentieth century, five men founded the Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company for the purpose of mining for corundum, an extremely hard and versatile mineral ideal for making sandpaper and grinding wheels. The company failed, however, discovering only a low-grade, inferior mineral called anorthosite. Today, with corporate operations in seventy countries and sales in two hundred countries, the same company is a household name across several industries
By: Britteny Junious Sugar has been a hot topic discussion among the sugar industry and its advocates, food regulatory officials, and dieticians for decades. The most prominent reason has been America’s struggle with controlling obesity rates and diabetes. It has been argued that to help control obesity, we must limit our daily intake of added sugars. The most recent 2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans suggests that Americans’ consumption of calories from added sugar should account…
By: Mona Ibadi  Since its inception over ten years ago, Bitcoin has been the focus of countless investors across the world. The unique nature of Bitcoin is that it does not require an intermediary such as a financial institution. Instead, users can access, buy, and send currency on an individual basis. The desire to make transactions without the centralization of money through a bank partially stems from a distrust of such institutions and the need…
By: Evan Federico The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (“FERC” or “the Commission”) will play a crucial role in President Joe Biden’s ambitious plans to tackle climate change and reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the power generation sector. FERC is an independent agency that regulates the interstate transmission of electricity, natural gas, and oil. Biden has already named Democratic Commissioner Richard Glick Chairman of FERC. Once Republican Commissioner Neil Chatterjee’s term expires in June of 2021,…
By: Kyle Tatich Dan Lust is an attorney in the New York City Office of Geragos & Geragos. After working for the New York Giants in their PR Department, Dan went on to Fordham Law School where he split his focus between Trial Advocacy and Sports Law. Dan parlays his sports-specific background to his litigation practice, where he represents a wide range of businesses and individuals in matters across the firm’s footprint.  He presently serves…
By: Mona Ibadi The United States spends billions of dollars making revolutionary strides in technological research every year. Businesses, big and small, are expending resources to provide up-to-date, innovative products to effectively compete in the market. Although technological development is rapidly growing, the concern for intellectual property theft remains an issue. Despite a lack of public concern, economic espionage from America’s leading culprit – the Chinese government – has increased by 1,300% in the past…