Technology Transactions Today

Insights, tips and trends in technology transactions from the country’s leading technology lawyers

Latest from Technology Transactions Today

If you listen very carefully, the age of information security as we know it ended recently, not with a bang, but with a whimper.  While that may be something of an overstatement, a recent event put us on the track to that very end. Consider the “old-way”: Your company decides to engage a vendor to provide services or products in which the vendor will have possession of, hosting of, access to, or other use of…
Cybercrime is an ever-increasing threat from which manufacturers are not immune. Although reliable statistics are not available, one particular type of scheme that seems to be on the rise is vendor payment fraud.  In cases of vendor payment fraud, the fraudster poses as an existing supplier and provides the manufacturer with seemingly legitimate instructions changing the account payment information.  The exact means by which vendor payment fraud schemes are perpetrated can take many forms.  However,…
In our May 31 article, “Scooters – The Next Mobility Wave”, we talked about how electric scooters such as Lime, Bird, and Spin have been taking cities by storm. We noted how they are many times met with enthusiasm by the younger and more adventurous residents who can easily find a scooter using an app on their phone, unlock it by scanning a code on the handle, and off they go. On the…
Additive manufacturing (aka 3D printing) has long been a growing part of the auto industry.   Companies started out using 3D printing for prototypes and small batch production.  As technology advanced, the role of 3D printing is rapidly increasing.  This week, several major players in the auto industry announced new developments for the role of 3D printing in the industry.  HP unveiled its “Metal Jet” 3D printers, which it describes as 50 times more productive,…
While there is time before the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 comes into effect, which is January 1, 2020, businesses need to start planning now for compliance. The CCPA provides California consumers with significantly expanded rights as to the collection and use of their personal information by businesses. It covers any business meeting revenue or data collection volume triggers and that collects or sells information about California residents.…
One of the key themes to emerge from Foley’s 2018 Cryptocurrency Survey was that investors and executives see the value of thoughtful regulation and are looking for more legal certainty as the industry matures.…
California companies housing their drivers’ personal information may feel less exposed to liability in light of the Northern District of California’s holding in Antman v. Uber Technologies, Inc. in May.[1] The trial court in Antman found that Uber was not liable to its drivers after hackers illicitly accessed their personal information through Uber’s computer system.[2] Plaintiffs Sasha Antman and Gustave Link alleged that the company failed to protect their personal information, as well…
In the competition amongst automobile manufacturers to knock autonomous driving out-of-the-park, Cadillac is next up to the plate.  Recently – rolling-out its newest autonomous driving technology – General Motors (“GM”) announced, beginning in 2020, “semi-autonomous” driving will be available in all Cadillac models.  Dubbed “Super Cruise,” the technology is GM’s latest attempt to capture some of the autonomous driving market share Tesla currently dominates.…
In a recent blog post, I discussed limitation of liability clauses in technology contracts. Given the favorable response to that post, I thought it would be of interest to discuss another misunderstood and frequently neglected area of technology contracting: information security warranties. Let me be more specific. Most well-drafted technology agreements contain specific warranties and other protections relating to the protection and security of data shared with the vendor. While clearly important, contract protections…
Recently, Representative Peter Welch of Vermont introduced legislation restructuring the planned phase out for the current electric vehicle $7500 federal tax credit.  As has been discussed in great detail in this blog, the current electric vehicle incentives begin to phase out individually for each manufacturer when that manufacturer delivers its 200,000th electric vehicle.  As a policy mechanism, the federal electric vehicle tax incentives positively influence both consumer and automotive manufacturer market behavior.  When implemented…