Latest from Women's Rights NY - Page 2

If you are pregnant and suffering severe anxiety right now about giving birth during this coronavirus (COVID-19) health crisis, your employer must take that into account and be flexible with you due to your current pregnancy-based limitations. The post Are you pregnant and suffering severe anxiety during the COVID-19 health crisis? appeared first on NY Employment Lawyers | Sexual Harassment | Wrongful Termination.…
By Jack Tuckner, Esq. I’m pregnant, due in June and incredibly anxious about giving birth in a hospital. I’m having a hard time concentrating at work and my boss is harassing me. Do I have any recourse? Yes, your pregnancy-related severe anxiety regarding giving birth in a hospital during this escalating and unprecedented American coronavirus pandemic is covered by the law. First, if you work in NYC, your pregnancy-related anxiety is absolutely covered under the…
By Jack Tuckner, Esq. On March 27, 2020, the United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) answered questions related to the intersection of COVID-19, pregnancy and the workplace, among other workplace questions. The full Q&A session may be seen below – The first pregnancy-related question the EEOC answered was Question 13: The CDC list of people who are at higher risk for severe illness if they contract COVID-19 includes a recommendation to monitor women who…
I’m pregnant, due in May and incredibly anxious about giving birth in a NYC hospital during this coronavirus crisis. I’m having a hard time concentrating at work and my boss is harassing me. Do I have any recourse? Jack Tuckner and Deborah O’Rell answer this and other questions concerning your rights as a pregnant employee. The post Am I entitled to employer flexibility for my pregnancy-related anxiety during this pandemic? appeared first on NY Employment
Workers in New York are protected under existing and new federal laws, as well as state laws. In addition to federal and state laws, employees who work in New York City are also entitled to protections under various NYC laws.  The following sections discuss the applicability of these laws. Am I Entitled to Paid Leave Under the NYC Paid Safe and Sick Leave Law if I Get the Coronavirus? Under the NYC Paid Safe and…
Hi, my name is Debrah O’Rell with Tuckner Sipser, an employment discrimination law firm. Today’s question is, Can I be Fired if I Make A Complaint to HR? And that answer depends on what you complained about. If you complained to HR about a coworker’s smelly lunch, or a manager who’s not distributing work fairly or equally, then yeah, they may find you annoying and they may be able to fire you. But if the…
If you’re pregnant and work in NY–the epicenter of the outbreak–and you’re still required to report to the workplace, either because you’re an “essential” employee, or because you’re one of the 25% of employees required to report to work during the mandatory closure of businesses, you are entitled to a “reasonable accommodation” of your pregnancy, which means that you’re entitled to special treatment due to the risks involved to you and your unborn child, or…
EQUAL PAY DAY 2020 Dates are based on 2019 U.S. Census data on median earnings for full-time, year-round employees. WOMEN COMPARED TO MEN: MARCH 31, 2020 — $0.82 (CENTS) WAGE GAP BY DEMOGRAPHIC Asian-American Women: Feb 11* — $0.90 (cents) Women: March 31 — $0.82 (cents) ** Black Women: Aug 13 — $0.62 (cents) Native American Women: Oct 1 — $0.57 (cents) Latina Women: Oct. 29 — $0.54 (cents) *Equal Pay figures for this community…
You know, I know a lot of folks have now lost their job already as a result of this crisis, and I hope like the rest of us, our national leadership will get out in front of this too. So if the most dire predictions don’t come true, but right now we’re getting in my office calls from people who have been laid off, fired and told that it is indefinite. And some of those…
If you work in NY and earn at least $58,500 per year and are a professional, executive or managerial administrative salaried employee, which generally means you’re in management, or you exercise discretion and independent judgment or supervise at least two other employees, then you’re “exempt” from federal and state overtime rules after you’ve worked 40 hours in any given workweek. Yet, just because you’re a salaried employee vs an hourly employee, that doesn’t mean you’re…