We are excited to present our sixth Data Security Incident Response Report (DSIR). We hope this issue finds you safe and healthy while working from home (WFH). Each year, we talk about last year’s trends and where we think the current year is taking us. Ransomware was, and continues to be, a big issue. We expect ransomware to continue full speed ahead. We are hopeful, however, that businesses are taking extra care with WFH rules to keep their data secure so that we do not see an increase in breaches due to simple mistakes.

This year, we are reporting on statistics from 950 of the 1,000+ incidents we helped manage in 2019. The incidents we worked on cover all industries and sizes of organizations. Although threats are always changing, we are hopeful that the information we are sharing in the Report will help you and your organization be better equipped to be “compromise ready.”

For more in-depth analysis on key items in the report, watch for our “DSIR Deeper Dive” posts in the coming weeks.

We hope you enjoy the report and you are welcome to reach out to any one of the DADM Group’s members with questions or suggestions.

Download the Report >>

Photo of Theodore J. Kobus III Theodore J. Kobus III

Ted Kobus is national co-leader of the firm’s Privacy and Data Protection team and focuses his practice in the areas of privacy, data breaches, social media and intellectual property. Prior to joining BakerHostetler, Ted served as head of the Technology, Media and Intellectual…

Ted Kobus is national co-leader of the firm’s Privacy and Data Protection team and focuses his practice in the areas of privacy, data breaches, social media and intellectual property. Prior to joining BakerHostetler, Ted served as head of the Technology, Media and Intellectual Property and Privacy and Data Security practices at another law firm.

Ted advises clients, trade groups and organizations regarding data security and privacy risk management, breaches, response strategies, litigation and regulatory actions affecting organizations. He has counseled clients involved in significant breaches implicating state and federal laws, international laws and other regulations and requirements, including HITECH, the Massachusetts Data Privacy Law, California privacy laws (including the California Department of Public Health Law), Connecticut Insurance Department regulations, Puerto Rico’s Citizen Information on Data Banks Security Act, Mexico’s Data Protection Law, Canada’s data privacy requirements and PCI/CISP requirements. He has dealt with Offices of Attorneys General, state insurance departments, Office of Civil Rights (OCR)/Health and Human Services (HHS), Secret Service, FBI and local police and forensics professionals as part of their handling of data breaches.