December is moving right along and our community continues to churn out quality post after quality post. This week we’ve got pieces on everything from workplace investigations in the UK to legal action taken by Peloton and lululemon against one another. Alongside our usual wide array of topics we’re starting to see firms publish their 2021 year-in-review posts and look ahead to 2022.


Michelle’s Picks

Unicorns and Loch Ness Monsters—Spotted Yesterday

Who wouldn’t click on a title like that? It’s not enough to just get someone to check out your article, you have to convince them to stay and read it. Beth Scherer does just that with this piece. It’s very visually appealing with hyperlinks, nice big block quotes and even an image. Her post is proof that you can make blogging fun and entertaining and is exactly what we mean when we urge bloggers to write in a casual tone like you would in an email or over dinner with a friend. Available at Fox Rothschild’s North Carolina Appellate Practice Blog.

The Long Haul to Work: Are you Entitled to be Paid for your Commute?

I gravitated towards this post as the subject matter feels relevant now more than ever. With remote work in place for so much of 2020, many employees certainly noticed financial positives when the commute to work was taken out of the equation. Stacey Ball looks at some exceptions in Ontario when an employee should be compensated for their commute. He goes beyond that to discuss an example case to demonstrate real-life implications of this matter. Available at Stacey R. Ball Employment Lawyer.  

Peloton and lululemon Yet to Work Things Out, File Cross Lawsuits

It’s always interesting to hear about lawsuits between two big name brands. This one involves lululemon and Peloton, both big names in the fitness space. Preetha Chakrabarti and Suzanne Trivette co-author this post which does a nice job walking the reader through the back and forth taking place between the two companies (who even had a co-branding relationship up until earlier this year). The piece ends with a short takeaway broadening the implications of this case to design patent protections and co-branding relationships as a whole. Available at Crowell and Moring’s Retail & Consumer Products Law Observer

Is there a better way to admit lawyers? The future of the bar exam needs a hard look

While a lot of blog posts take the route of shorter form writing, it’s always great to see a longer piece that explores a serious, relevant issue in-depth. Associate Professor Leanne Fuith authors this excellent post on one of the most relevant legal matters—the bar exam. She walks the readers first through the history of racialized gatekeeping and gender disparities throughout the years and then touches on the underlying problems that the exam presents. This post is organized well with headers so you can find the information you’re looking for quickly—though I’d reccomend reading it at length as it’s very informative and well-written. Available at Minnesota State Bar Association’s Bench & Bar of Minnesota.


Alec’s Picks

Ponzi Perspectives: 2021 Year-End Roundup

As 2021 draws to a close we are seeing some excellent “Year-in-Review” posts from all corners of our community. The team at McGuireWoods LLP’s Ponzi Perspectives is among them as they reflected on their first year as a blog. This roundup post conveys the great-deal of effort this team has put into their blog since launch. They summarize some of the biggest happenings in Ponzi litigation and link to more than 20 individual blog posts as they discuss trends they observed over the past year. Ponzi Perspectives is off to a great start and we can’t wait to see what they can do in their second year. This post was written by Jarrod Shaw, Nellie Hestin, Jared DeBona and Katelyn Fox.

Looking into workplace investigations, Part 1 – what are you talking about? (UK)

David Whincup kicked off a new series of posts this week taking a look at workplace investigations and the law surrounding them in the UK. Turns out, there is very little law in this area making these posts all the more prescient given Whincup’s extensive knowledge. This is just an overall really well written piece with tons of great insights in a still concise piece. Whincup even injects a little humor and does a frear job of speaking directly to his blog’s audience which are HR practitioners. I’m a big fan of bloggers starting up series on specific topics—it really helps with reader engagement. I’m looking forward to reading the next posts from Whincup. Available at Squire Patton Boggs’ Employment Law Worldview.

Lawyers Are An Alien Herd

In this post Stephen Embry speaks about what he refers to as the “Middle”—people and small businesses who need legal services, can afford some level of them, but are not well-served by the legal industry as it currently exists. I commend Embry for recognizing this issue and writing so eloquently on it. His words convey a real passion for this topic and the ideas and reforms he explores in his post resonated with me. Blogging has the power to generate meaningful discussion and create change and I hope this post does just that. Available at TechLaw Crossroads.

Photo of Alec Downing Alec Downing

Alec is an intern on LexBlog’s publishing team where he creates content for the company’s various digital platforms. A former radio news anchor, Alec brings both a background in journalism and a passion for law. Alec has the eventual goal of attending law…

Alec is an intern on LexBlog’s publishing team where he creates content for the company’s various digital platforms. A former radio news anchor, Alec brings both a background in journalism and a passion for law. Alec has the eventual goal of attending law school—and of course—starting his own law blog. His writing has been published in The Seattle Times and Crosscut.

Photo of Michelle Newblom Michelle Newblom

Michelle works on LexBlog’s Publishing team and assists in managing and creating the company’s editorial and social content, as well as working with clients to ensure the overall success of their blogs. She has experience working in all different realms of publishing—including newspapers,

Michelle works on LexBlog’s Publishing team and assists in managing and creating the company’s editorial and social content, as well as working with clients to ensure the overall success of their blogs. She has experience working in all different realms of publishing—including newspapers, magazines and research journals. Michelle has published a poetry book and been featured in an anthology.