Dan Flynn

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Editor Dan Flynn is a Northern Colorado-based writer and editor with more more than 15 years of food safety experience. As a public affairs professional, he worked with government and regulatory agencies at the local, state, and federal levels. His career as a journalist included working for newspapers throughout the West, from the Black Hills to Seattle. His on-scene reporting on the collapse of the Idaho’s Teton Dam and the suicide bombing at Washington State University’s Perham Hall was carried by newspapers around the world and was recognized both times regionally by the Associated Press for Best Reporting on a Deadline. Most of the disasters he attends these days involve food illnesses.

Latest Articles

The U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania has filed a civil action against Amos Miller and Miller’s Organic Farm in Bird-in-Hand, PA. It is not the first time that the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service has enlisted the Department of Justice (DOJ) to get Miller to comply with some of the federal government’s basic food safety laws and regulations. The last time the DOJ went up against the “ethical…
Thirteen people in seven states are infected with an outbreak strain of Salmonella Newport, the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta reported Tuesday. Raw, ground tuna is believed to be the source of the infections. North Dakota and Washington State each reported four cases.   Connecticut, Iowa, Illinois, Minnesota and New York each had one case. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and health and regulatory officials in the several states…
There are three current multistate outbreaks of Salmonella in the United States. Two–infections linked to Butterball Brand Ground Turkey and Precut melons–are outbreaks that began in 2019 and the third involving ground turkey was a 2018 outbreak of raw ground turkey products that remain open. Taken together, the three have sickened 279 people resulting in 107 hospitalizations and one death. One or the other of these outbreaks has spread the Salmonella infections to nearly every…
Opinion I’ve been coming to this stretch of California’s coast running from San Luis Obispo to Ventura for more years than I care to remember. It’s the province of the California Environmental Health Association’s Mission Chapter. California is a big place, and in addition to its Mission area, CEHA has six other chapters: Superior, Central, Citrus, ,Southwest, Redwood, and Northern. When Julie Hobberlin, co-chair of CEHA’s 2019 Awards Committee, informed me that Food Safety News…
Ground beef, consumed at home or in restaurants, and possibly purchased in large packages from grocery stores just might be the source of the now six-state E. coli O103 outbreak, according to CDC. In an update of its last report just three days earlier, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta shared its preliminary epidemiologic information that implicates ground beef for infecting at least 109 people. In the three days since its…
Seattle-King County Public Health is investigating an outbreak of norovirus-like illness with vomiting, diarrhea, body aches, chills, and fever associated with Dave & Buster’s in Auburn, WA. Since April 5, 2019, five people from a single meal party reported becoming ill after consuming food and beverages from Dave & Buster’s in Auburn on March 31, 2019.  Since then public health identified at least seven employees who also experienced symptoms consistent with norovirus dating back to…
The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA’s) Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) went on the record Monday with a long list of things the agency found wrong in a Washington Post story last week about the New Swine Slaughter Inspection System (NSIS). Here’s how the Washington Post began their lengthy report: “The Trump administration plans to shift much of the power and responsibility for food safety inspections in hog plants to the pork industry as…
The Kentucky-centered outbreak of the rare E. coli O103 strain infects 72 people in five states, according to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta. Eight people with the outbreak strain have been hospitalized, the CDC report says. No cases of the hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) or deaths have been reported. CDC says the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS), the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA),…
Since late last year when Missouri became the first state to ban lab-grown food from being labeled as “meat,”  laws in five more states have put the same labeling limits on these emerging technologies and a sixth is about the join the Show-Me-State ban. It means at least seven new laws were put on the books in less than one year, limiting commercial speech while expanding consumer protection fo cover cell-cultured food products that are…
In less than a week, that Kentucky-centered outbreak of the rare E. coli O103 has exploded to 44 cases in the Bluegrass State and spread to Tennessee, Ohio, and Georgia, the Minneapolis-based Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy (CIDRAP) reports. As recently as last Friday (March 29), the Kentucky case count stood at 24. CIDRAP, headed by Dr. Michael Osterholm, Ph.D., MPH, University of Minnesota Regents Professor, and McKnight Presidential Endowed Chair in Public…