David Pivnick

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David‘s practice is focused on complex commercial litigation with an emphasis on healthcare litigation. He has represented and advised clients across the country, including hospitals, ambulatory surgery centers, pharmaceutical manufacturers, and medical device manufacturers, in a variety of matters involving managed care issues, contract law, restrictive covenants, trade secrets, injunctive relief, the False Claims Act, unfair competition, partnership disputes, and products liability. David has also provided clients with guidance on compliance issues and conducted internal investigations relating to compliance and other issues.

Latest Articles

Due to the infrequency in which the situation arises, the FCA’s “alternate remedy” provision is infrequently invoked or discussed.  In short, this provision states that when the relator presents information about a potential FCA claim for the Government to investigate, the Government has the option to pursue this claim through “any alternate remedy available to the Government.”  The provision goes on to explain that if the Government pursues an “alternate remedy,” the relator has the…
Earlier this year, the Third Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed the decision of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania in the case of DiFiore v. CSL Behring, LLC.  DiFiore v. CSL Behring, LLC, 879 F.3d 71, 73 (3d Cir. 2018). The opinion set forth the precedent that “but-for causation” is required for an FCA retaliation claim. The litigation involved the claims of a former employee of CSL Behring, Marie Difiore,…
Caris Healthcare, L.P. has entered an agreement with the DOJ in which it has agreed to pay $8.5 million to resolve allegations that it violated the False Claims Act. The qui tam action was filed in the Eastern District of Tennessee by a registered nurse who was formerly an employees of Caris Healthcare. The former employee alleged that Caris Healthcare submitted false claims and retained overpayments in connection with claims for hospice services.  The patients at issue were…
The FCA’s statute of limitations, 31 U.S.C. § 3731(b), has been a source of confusion and disagreement amongst the courts and litigants for years. The disagreement is focused primarily on whether a relator in a non-intervened case can take advantage of the three-year government knowledge/ten-year lookback provision under subsection (b)(2) or whether the relator is limited to the six-year limitation in subsection (b)(1). The majority of courts have held that the relator is bound…
The United States Attorney’s Office for the Middle District of Florida recently settled a False Claims Act case against Healogics, Inc. (“Healogics”) in which it was alleged that Healogics had knowingly billed Medicare for medically unnecessary and unreasonable hyperbaric oxygen therapy (“HBO therapy”). Under the settlement, Healogics agreed to pay $17.5 million, plus an additional $5.01 that is dependent upon certain financial contingencies. The settlement also provides for a whistleblower share of up to $4,276,000.…
A former prosecutor for the United States Department of Justice has pled guilty to attempting to sell sealed False Claims cases to the defendants in those cases and to transporting stolen goods across state lines. Jeffrey Wertkin was a DOJ prosecutor who had entered private practice with Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld. Mr. Wertkin was arrested by the FBI in January 2017 in a California hotel, wearing a disguise, while attempting to sell a…
The United States Department of Justice has issued a press release announcing that it recovered more than $3.7 Billion from False Claims Act (FCA) cases during fiscal year 2017 (October 1, 2016 through September 30, 2017).  This recovery marks a decline from the $4.7 Billion that the DOJ recovered in fiscal year 2016, but it is the sixth consecutive year in which the Government’s FCA recoveries have exceeded $3.5 Billion. Once again, the healthcare industry was responsible for the majority of the Government’s FCA…
The FCA contains several provisions that are aimed at discouraging “parasitic” or duplicative qui tam actions. One such provision, known as the “government-action bar,” prohibits relators from bring a qui tam action “based upon allegations or transactions which are the subject of a civil suit . . . in which the Government is already a party.” 31 U.S.C. § 3730(e)(3). In United States ex rel. Bennett v. Biotronik, Inc., — F.3d —-, No. 16-15919,…
On September 11, 2017, in United States and State of Nevada ex rel. Welch v. My Left Foot Children’s Therapy, LLC, the Ninth Circuit held that an arbitration agreement between an employee-relator and her former employer was not broad enough to cover the Relator’s whistleblower claims under the FCA.  This opinion raises questions as to whether FCA claims can be subject to arbitration agreements to which the government is not a party. In Welch,…
On April 4, 2017, in United States ex rel. Hayes v. Allstate Ins. Co., 853 F.3d 80 (2nd Cir. 2017), the Second Circuit joined the D.C. Court of Appeals in holding that the first-to-file bar is not jurisdictional, and therefore, that a court is not deprived of subject matter jurisdiction upon a first-to-file bar finding. Generally speaking, the first-to-file rule, 31 U.S.C. § 3730(b)(5), prohibits an individual from bringing a qui tam action if there…