Julia M. Ansanelli

Photo of Julia M. Ansanelli

Julia Ansanelli earned her bachelor's degree from New York University and her J.D. from Touro Law Center, where she graduated as valedictorian of her division. During law school, she served as case note editor of the Touro Law Review and vice president of Touro's Latin American Law School Association. Julia also interned for the Honorable Magistrate Kathleen Tomlinson in the Eastern District of New York.

Latest Articles

Yesterday, 23 law professors represented by Proskauer were granted permission to participate as amici curiae in a class action lawsuit contesting a recent U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) policy change affecting minors in New York who seek Special Immigrant Juvenile Status (SIJS).  This policy change has resulted in SIJS denials for immigrant children who would otherwise qualify for SIJS based on well-established state and federal law. SIJS is a form of immigration relief that…
Last week, a federal judge in California denied the plaintiff’s motions to disqualify the defendant’s counsel, finding that the firm’s former representation of the plaintiff was not sufficiently recent, substantial, or substantively related to the firm’s current representation of the defendant to warrant disqualification. The plaintiff, IPS Group, Inc., brought two related lawsuits against Duncan Solutions, Inc., for patent infringement — one in July 2015 and another in March 2017. In June 2017, the law…
The SEC has been active in pursuing several insider trading cases this year on both the large and the small-scale, some of which involved trades that yielded profits as small as $40,000-$60,000. Why does the enforcement division spend resources on these smaller cases? And how will the SEC continue to investigate new leads through data analysis? For additional guidance, please see our post on the Corporate Defense and Disputes blog.…
The SEC has continued to pursue a number of insider trading cases this year, both large-scale and small. Some of those matters involved trades that yielded relatively small amounts of profits: $40,000-$60,000. Why does the enforcement division spend resources on these smaller cases? First, they serve as a reminder that violations can be identified, even if trades are relatively small. And the cases are relatively easy to prove when a connection to an insider source…