Justin E. Pierce

Latest Articles

Amazon has just announced Project Zero to potentially assist brand owners in combatting counterfeit goods by removing products likely to be fake from the online retailer’s platform. Project Zero would allow brand owners to designate product listings for removal, instead of undergoing Amazon’s prior reporting and removal process, which required brand owners to report counterfeit products to an internal Amazon team for investigation prior to removal. So far, Amazon has tested the Project Zero pilot…
Tiffany & Co., a world-renowned jeweler and specialty retailer, successfully won a judgment that Costco was appropriating its Tiffany® trademark. Federal Judge Laura T. Swain ordered Costco to pay Tiffany & Co. $19.4 million for trademark infringement and trademark counterfeiting under the Lanham Act, as well as unfair competition under New York state law, in the latest round in a long-running legal battle over the sale of engagement rings bearing the mark “Tiffany” as a standalone…
3D printing, also referred to as “additive manufacturing” or “rapid prototyping,” is the process of making three-dimensional objects from digital designs. Two of the most common types of printers are “disposition printers,” which deposit layers of materials until the 3D object is built, and “binding printers,” which build the object by binding, usually with adhesive or laser fusing, the underlying layers, to create a whole object at the end of the process. Perhaps this…
Since we are now fully comfortable with “smart” everything, it should be no surprise that 3D printing has taken center stage in the tech world. It’s easy to imagine 3D-printed machine parts, prototype models, or even toys, but it might be harder to accept 3D-printed foods, implantable medical devices, cosmetics, drugs, and even human tissue.  Too futuristic? Not really. The technology to 3D-print, U.S. Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”)-regulated products is, in…
As expected, NASA recently successfully completed the first hot-fire tests on an advanced rocket engine thrust chamber assembly using copper alloy materials.  This was the first time a series of rigorous tests confirmed that 3D manufactured copper parts could withstand the heat and pressure required of combustion engines used in space launches. In all, 19 hot-fire tests on four injector and thrust chamber assembly configurations were conducted. These successful tests represent a milestone in NASA’s use…
We are entering a brave new world of food design and regulation brought to us through the mechanical development and visual artistry of 3D printing. As with any new medium, understanding what we confront and its regulation lag behind the medium’s implementation. 3D printing, also referred to as “additive manufacturing” or “rapid prototyping,” is the process of making three-dimensional objects from digital designs. Two of the most common types of printers are “disposition printers,” which…
We agree – the Jetsons era has indeed arrived. Beyond the days of “smart” everything, now 3D printing has taken center stage in the tech world. While it is not so farfetched to imagine 3D-printed machine parts, prototype models, or even toys, it is might be harder to watch it printing foods, implantable medical devices, cosmetics, drugs and even human tissue. All too futuristic? Not really. The technology of 3D-print FDA-regulated products is, in…
Many business people, from both start-ups and major multinational corporations, often question the value or reasoning behind the trademark advice they receive from their lawyers.  For instance, business people often ask “do we really need to do this?” – after being told that extensive trademark searching must be done to find a potential brand name that is legally available.  Oftentimes the cost of careful trademark work seems to outweigh its benefits and seems too speculative…
Many of the top companies in the world use distinctive and inventive naming for their brand names. Our recent review of 2012 Brand Finance Global 500 rankings reveals a trend — the top 10 global brands are getting more inventive. 80% of the brand names represented are inherently distinctive, meaning they are fanciful or ‘made up’ words such as “Vodafone”, or arbitrary words used out of context such as “Apple”. In contrast, from 2007 through…