Jonathan F. Tabasky

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Jonathan Tabasky represents architects, attorneys, engineers, real estate brokers and appraisers, and independent insurance adjusters, among others, in negligence/professional malpractice cases. He also represents a broad range of companies in product liability and toxic tort cases including manufacturers of prescription drugs, protective clothing, fittings, heating devices, wire and cable, trucks, aircraft and turbines.

Latest Articles

The overwhelming majority of courts (including all seven federal circuits that considered the issue) have rejected the so-called “innovator liability” doctrine.[1]  In 2017, however, the California Supreme Court in T.H. v. Novartis Pharm. Corp.[2] unanimously recognized the doctrine holding that brand-name prescription drug manufacturers owe a duty to warn to consumers who use generic drugs.[3]  In March of 2018, the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court (SJC) considered the issue, and took a middle…
For the first time since 1989[1], Connecticut’s Supreme Court addressed the plaintiff’s burden of proof in the asbestos context, in Wayne Bagley v. Adel Wiggins Group et al, SC 19835 (11/7/17).  In a win for defendants facing such claims, the court found that plaintiffs bringing claims pursuant to the Connecticut Product Liability Act (under both strict liability and negligence theories) require expert testimony to prove exposure at levels sufficient to cause their asbestos-related disease, and…
On January 31, 2017, President Trump nominated Judge Neil Gorsuch to the U.S. Supreme Court. Although time will tell, this post assumes he will make it through the Senate confirmation process, and take his place at 1 First Street, Northeast. Currently, Judge Gorsuch sits on the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit, having been appointed to same by President George W. Bush on July 20, 2006.  While at the Tenth, Judge Gorsuch…
The District of Columbia Court of Appeals recently adopted the standards found in Federal Rule of Evidence 702 (“Rule 702”), regarding the admissibility of testimony by expert witnesses, thereby replacing the Frye (“Frye”) test.  See Motorola Inc., et al. v. Michael Patrick Murray, et al., 2016 WL 6134870 (October 20, 2016)(“Motorola”). Washington D.C. is now the most recent jurisdiction to adopt Rule 702, a trend that has continued since Rule 702 was amended in 2000…
Last summer the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court (SJC) made several significant changes to the Massachusetts Rules of Professional Conduct (Mass. R. Prof. C.). Previous posts highlighted some of these changes, including to the Rules pertaining to jury contact following trial and the duty to remain current on technologies which impact the practice of law. The Rule discussed herein relates to a trend often seen in the service sector, and which has over the past years…
As previously reported, following the 2012 and 2013 American Bar Association’s amendments to its Model Rules of Professional Conduct, many jurisdictions began to reexamine their own rules.  Massachusetts followed suit, and on July 1, 2015, the Supreme Judicial Court (SJC) adopted several revisions to the Massachusetts Rules of Professional Conduct (Mass. R. Prof. C.) recommended by its Standing Advisory Committee.  This blog post is the second in a series designed to inform practitioners of several…
Following the 2012 and 2013 American Bar Association’s amendments to its Model Rules of Professional Conduct, many jurisdictions began to reexamine their own rules.  Massachusetts followed suit, and on July 1, 2015, the Supreme Judicial Court (SJC) adopted several revisions to the Massachusetts Rules of Professional Conduct (Mass. R. Prof. C.) recommended by its Standing Advisory Committee.  This blog post will be the first in a series designed to inform practitioners of several important changes…
Ben Franklin famously warned that “you may delay, but time will not, and lost time is never found again.” These words of wisdom appear to be lost on the Illinois state legislature, which recently abolished the ten-year statute of repose for personal injury claims related to asbestos exposure under 735 ILCS 5/13-214. Far from an esoteric legal issue, the amendment has become the front line in the latest battle of the national divide on the…
Plaintiffs, when faced with a legal bar to traditional negligence claims, frequently try to cloak them in new theories of liability. This tactic is reminiscent of dialogue in William Shakespeare’s play Romeo and Juliet, in which Juliet argues that the names of things do not matter, only what things “are” is truly important. Trend An upsurge in this practice took place following the Supreme Court’s decision in Pliva Inc., v. Mensing, 131 S.Ct. 2567 (2011),…
Written by Jonathan F. Tabasky and Kate B. Puccio Massachusetts Superior Court Judge Bruce R. Henry recently dismissed a series of claims against several manufacturers of the generic drug Metoclopramide (“MCP”), against whom failure to warn claims was alleged.  See White v. Elsevier, Inc., Middlesex Superior Court Civil Action No. 11-04441.  In so doing, Judge Henry held that Plaintiffs’ state law claims were preempted by federal law which prohibited different labeling than that associated with…