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Any organization with a publicly-facing website—in other words, virtually any organization—should be aware that the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) recently published its most recent update to the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0, titled WCAG 2.1. The W3C is a private organization that develops website accessibility standards. As you may now know, in recent years, the WCAG 2.0 has become the widely accepted industry standard of technical requirements for making websites, mobile apps,…
Is your website covered by the Americans with Disabilities Act? The short answer is: possibly. This area of the law continues to evolve, with differences from jurisdiction to jurisdiction based on the type of website. But make no mistake: lawsuits alleging lack of website accessibility are hot. The most common allegation is that the company website is inaccessible to visually-impaired customers, although some cases now involve mobile apps. Such customers often rely on screen-reader software…
You might have heard about “mining for metadata.”  What does it mean?  How is it done?  Should you do it? When the origins of a critical document are at issue, you know to examine that document’s metadata. “Mining for metadata” is something else. It’s the process of using software to systematically search through the metadata embedded in a collection of documents. Since metadata sometimes can determine or affect the outcome of a case, it’s important…
Part One: Mandatory Leave Payout and Its Relationship to Traditional “Use-It-Or-Lose-It” Policies Bob decides the grass is in fact greener at another company, and resigns. Carla is fired for insubordination. Dan wins the lottery and quits without notice. Each now is demanding payment for accrued but unused paid vacation leave. While they worked for you in three different states, you thought this would be a one-answer-fits-all situation, because your organization’s “use-it-or-lose-it” policy applies across the board. Well, you…