Lindsey Olson

Photo of Lindsey Olson

As a litigation associate, Lindsey Olson focuses her practice on white-collar defense and investigations and complex commercial litigation. She has particular experience representing individual and corporate clients in connection with domestic and international government-facing investigations.

Practice highlights include representing a leading global financial institution in a sweeping, multi-year federal criminal investigation into a multi-billion dollar investment portfolio; representing an individual in connection with criminal investigations relating to allegations of manipulation and collusion in the precious metals market; and representing a major cultural institution regarding allegations of abusive conduct by a high profile employee.

Latest Articles

Nearly 10 years ago, in the summer of 2008, I began my first job after college as a program associate at Association to Benefit Children (A-B-C) in East Harlem.  Entering the real world unsure of what career I wanted to pursue, I leapt at the chance to have a two-year fellowship at a community-based nonprofit in New York City. That decision was life-changing.…
Terrorist attacks, most recently in London and Manchester, England, have raised the pressure on law enforcement and lawmakers in countries like the U.K. and the U.S., to proactively intercept and interrupt terrorist communications. On May 24, members of the Senate Judiciary Committee’s Subcommittee on Crime and Terrorism addressed practical issues regarding warrants for overseas data in a hearing titled “Law Enforcement Access to Data Stored Across Borders.” …
Proskauer partner Joshua M. Newville and associate Lindsey A. Olson recently wrote the lead article for New York Law Journal’s White-Collar Crime special report. In the article, they discuss how proposed amendments to the Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986 could affect financial fraud investigations by the SEC and DOJ.  For more information, please read the article entitled How Proposed Changes to the ECPA Affect Privacy Interests in Investigations.…
This week, Deputy Attorney General Sally Q. Yates delivered remarks at the New York City Bar Association reflecting on the eight months since the release of the “Yates Memo,” or as Deputy AG Yates prefers, the “Individual Accountability Policy” (“the Policy”).  The Policy’s release in September 2015 followed prolonged criticism over a perceived lack of prosecution of individuals responsible for corporate misconduct.  Aimed at increasing prosecutions of such individuals, the Policy outlined six…
Following the D.C. Circuit’s July 14, 2015 decision in Koch et al. v. Securities and Exchange Commission, No. 14-1134 (D.C. Cir. July 14, 2015), which held that the SEC could not retroactively punish an investment advisor for conduct that occurred prior to the enactment of the statute authorizing the punishment, the SEC announced last week that it would not seek further review of that decision.…