Mark Alexander

Photo of Mark Alexander

Mark Alexander is the principal of the Firm. In 1979, he earned his undergraduate degree at Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan, and his law degree at Thomas M. Cooley, Lansing, Michigan, in 1985 (Academic Dean’s List).

Mr. Alexander is licensed to practice law by the Supreme Courts of the States of Texas (1985) and Michigan (1988), and holds licenses before the following courts: Supreme Court of Texas; Supreme Court of Michigan; United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth and Sixth Circuits; United States District Courts for the Northern, Southern, and Western Districts of Texas; and the Eastern and Western Districts of Michigan. In addition he has been admitted in several other Federal and State Courts to represent Texas clients, who have been engaged in significant litigation in those jurisdictions.

Courts have appointed Mr. Alexander to serve as a receiver, and facilitator in complex litigation lawsuits. Additionally he has been a frequent lecturer for organizations on a variety of business law matters.  Mr. Alexander has also served as an Adjunct Professor of Business Law at Henry Ford College in Dearborn, Michigan. Significantly, Mr. Alexander is AV-rated by Martindale-Hubbell, the highest rating an attorney can receive.

Additionally, due to the complex nature of its practice, the Firm has an on-going relationship with a legal group that provides litigation support services. This group is comprised of a team of attorneys, whose combined capabilities allow the group to provide nearly 24-hour coverage at crucial times for any case. This arrangement is but one example of the innovative, cutting-edge approach that the Firm provides to its clients in order to improve representation at reduced legal fees.

Latest Articles

Long Term Incentive Payment (LTI) David Sellers found himself unemployed when his employer was purchased by another company that immediately started slashing costs. Despite an employment agreement requiring the employer to pay COBRA benefits and $68,000 in outstanding sales commissions, Sellers did not receive payment, and subsequently sued for fraud and breach of fiduciary duty. The COBRA and sales commission matters were resolved. However, Sellers believed he was owed $428,681 as a long-term incentive payment
The silver trade is alive, but 300 investors may not feel so well. The SEC filed charges in November against Gaylen Dean Rust and Rust Rare Coin of Utah. During a 20-month period in 2017 and 2018, Rust secured over $85 million from investors in a silver trading scheme. The details of this Ponzi scheme will give silver tarnish new meaning. The Family Business Rust’s father started a rare coin shop in 1966. Gaylen Rust took…
There’s nothing new about people lying about their education and experience. And some people love to name drop, or even lie about who they know. In the midst of all this truth stretching, have we started ignoring the signals of liars and fraudsters? In the case of Frisco real estate developer, Phillip Michael Carter, his “regular” lies were only the beginning of defrauding 100 Texas investors out of $17.5 million. Carter was recently arrested and…
Breach of contract cases are sometimes considered boring, and the results predictable. Recently, however, a reminder of the unpredictable nature of commercial litigation came across my desk. In that case an executive lured a competitor away from a company without suffering legal consequences other than legal fees and court costs. The Parties. Two companies entered into a contract with a covenant not to compete. Diligent contracted with Clarence Meyers (President and majority owner of BOC…
What happens over three million times a day? According to a 2018 Fortune article, the answer can be found in the Texas and New Mexico Permian Basin. Oil and Gas Production. “Oil production in the Permian soared to 3.2 million barrels per day in May. And it helped push total U.S. production above 10.2 million barrels per day in February …, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). In April, an average of 449…
Is everything bigger in Texas? The latest oil and gas investment scam to catch the SEC’s attention involves AmeraTex, Lewis Oil Corp. and Lewis Oil Co., along with Thomas Lewis (Kentucky), Damon Fox (Rowlett), and Brian Bull (Dallas). The case is reminiscent of an episode of the television night drama, “Dallas.” While fraud may not be bigger in Texas, it does include expenditures for adult entertainment and lavish lifestyles. Living Large on Other People’s Money.…
Brandon Davis, named one of the “Top 40 under 40” by the Denver Business Journal, recently lost an eight-year battle representing himself, Heartland Energy Development Corporation (HEDC) and others in a Denver District Court. The Colorado Securities Commissioner plans to ask the court to order Defendants to pay $65 million restitution for an oil and gas investment scam. Davis plans to appeal the injunction against HEI Resources and HEDC. The 39 page court order, including…
How many people does it take to steal $4.3 million? Allegedly, one. Justin Foust of Oklahoma faces eight counts of wire fraud, two counts of aggravated identity theft and one money laundering charge as of January 2018. While this may not be your typical oil and gas investment scam, this corporate fraud scheme was well-orchestrated from inside of a $7.8 billion-dollar oil and gas company with over 3,200 employees. Oil and Gas Accounting Fraud. Chesapeake…
Penn West Petroleum, Ltd d/b/a Obsidian Energy Ltd. recently agreed to pay $8.5 million in civil penalties in settling SEC charges.  According to an SEC Litigation Release , Penn West’s former CFO, Todd Takeyasu, and former vice president of accounting and reporting, Jeffery Curran, are still part of an SEC litigation matter regarding an oil and gas investment scam. The original complaint reads like a classic accounting fraud scheme, resulting in overstated financials by 16…
William Veasey, founder of Texas based Petroforce Energy LLC, raised nearly $4 million in four allegedly fraudulent oil and gas offerings from approximately 80 investors. The Fort Worth SEC office investigated the dealings, and now both Veasey and Petroforce have agreed to settle an oil and gas fraud case. According to the SEC’s complaint, Petroforce and Veasy provided investors with misleading and false statements regarding oil and gas investments, including paraffin issues at the drilling…