Marion Nestle

Photo of Marion Nestle

Marion Nestle is Paulette Goddard Professor in the Department of Nutrition, Food Studies, and Public Health (the department she chaired from 1988-2003) and Professor of Sociology at New York University. Her degrees include a Ph.D. in molecular biology and an M.P.H. in public health nutrition, both from the University of California, Berkeley. She is the author of Food Politics: How the Food Industry Influences Nutrition and Health (2002, paperback 2003) and Safe Food: Bacteria, Biotechnology, and Bioterrorism (2003, paperback 2004), both from University of California Press. Her book, What to Eat, published by North Point Press/ Farrar, Straus & Giroux (2006, paperback 2007), was named as one of Amazon.Com's top ten books of 2006 (Health, Mind, and Body) , and a "Must Read" by Eating Well magazine. Her most recent book is Pet Food Politics: The Chihuahua in the Coal Mine, published by University of California Press in 2008. Her forthcoming book, co-authored with Malden Nesheim, is Feed Your Pet Right (Free Press/Simon & Schuster, May 2010).

Latest Articles

While Congress is fussing over the farm bill, Michele Simon’s new report, Food Stamps: Follow the Money, identifies the businesses that most stand to gain from the $72 billion spent last year on SNAP.  This program, formerly known as food stamps, gave 46 million Americans an average of  $134 per month to spend on food in late 2011. Just as health and anti-obesity advocates are working to bring agricultural policy in line with…
Ordinarily I find government plans of this type to be soporific but this one is especially well written and well thought out (with some caveats). The report is a statement of FDA commitment to what it is going to do in the next four years in food areas that affect people and animals.  It includes many promises, among them this one of particular interest:  Program Goal 4: Provide accurate and useful information so consumers can…
The “pink slime” furor gets curiouser and curiouser.  It’s hard to keep up (see yesterday’s post) but here’s my summary of where we are with this for the moment. What is the furor about? The best place to start is with Michael Moss’s December 30, 2009 investigative report in the New York Times on the ammonia process used by Beef Products, Inc to make LFTB (lean finely textured beef). The article contains the first…
Bacterial contamination of meat is an ongoing problem and everyone wishes for an easy fix–one that does not require meat producers and packers to prevent contamination. Irradiation works, but raises feasibility and other concerns. How about electrocution? Food Production Daily reports that hitting meat with electrical current reduces toxic E. coli O157:H7 on meat surfaces by 2 log units. The research report says researchers inoculated meat with the bacteria and then applied electrical current.  But…