Phillip Caraballo-Garrison

Photo of Phillip Caraballo-Garrison

Phil Caraballo is a senior associate in the Litigation Department, where he also represents the Litigation Department on the Associate Council. His practice focuses on white collar criminal defense and corporate investigations, appellate litigation, and complex civil litigation at both the state and federal levels.

As a member of the White Collar Defense & Investigations Group, Phil represents clients in prosecutions involving a broad array of federal and state crimes, including insider trading, racketeering, tax evasion, money laundering, and antitrust charges. He frequently guides corporate clients through internal investigations conducted in cooperation with law enforcement and regulatory agencies, and internal investigations and due diligence processes focused on resolving potential anti-corruption issues under the FCPA.

Latest Articles

Last week, the DOJ announced its first corporate enforcement action under the Foreign Corrupt Practice Act (“FCPA”) for 2015. IAP World Services, Inc., a Florida-based defense and government contractor, agreed to pay $7.1 million in a non-prosecution agreement (NPA) for conspiring to bribe Kuwaiti officials in exchange for a contract to build a large-scale homeland surveillance system in Kuwait. The primary employee involved, James Rama, pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to violate the…
Last week, the Texas Supreme Court joined the majority of jurisdictions in holding that a company enjoys an absolute privilege when providing the Department of Justice (DOJ) with an internal investigation report containing statements later alleged by an employee to be defamatory. The decision in Shell Oil Co. v. Writt, __S.W.3d__ (Tex. 2015) should provide Texas companies comfort that cooperating with regulatory and law enforcement agencies will not expose them to liability for defamation. The…
As previously reported on this blog here and here, the United States Sentencing Commission has proposed amendments to the widely criticized federal sentencing guidelines for economic crimes. On April 9, 2015, after hearing extensive public comment on the proposed amendments, the Commission voted to adopt an amended version of the Sentencing Guidelines which will take effect November 1st absent objection by Congress. The changes are significant but not sweeping. Commission Chair Judge Patti B.…
As previously reported on this blog, the U.S. Sentencing Commission has proposed several amendments to the federal sentencing guidelines for economic crimes. The amendments are designed to address criticism that § 2B1.1 of the Guidelines is vague, that it treats defendants who have secondary roles with undue harshness, and that it suggests disproportionately severe sentences for first-time offenders. On March 18, 2015, the Sentencing Commission heard commentary and reviewed letters in response to a…
Following recent trends, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission brought an administrative proceeding against a U.S. issuer for the alleged corrupt activities of its foreign subsidiaries. Earlier this week, Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company agreed to pay the SEC over $16 million to settle charges alleging that it violated the accounting provisions of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act by failing to prevent or detect over $3 million in bribes paid by its Angolan and Kenyan…
On February 3, 2015, the SEC’s Office of Compliance Inspections and Examinations (“OCIE”) issued a Risk Alert that summarized its findings about cybersecurity preparedness in the securities industry.  As part of its Cyber Security Examination Initiative, the OCIE collected and analyzed information about cybersecurity practices and trends from over 100 registered investment advisers and broker-dealers.  Proskauer discussed the OCIE study and its key findings in a client alert located here. With the OCIE stating
In recent years, a growing chorus of federal judges and defense attorneys have protested that the Federal Sentencing Guidelines for economic crimes regularly recommend inconsistent and unjust sentences. Critics claim that § 2B1.1 of the Guidelines suffers from a lack of clarity, that it treats defendants who have secondary roles in large schemes with undue harshness, and that it produces suggested prison terms that are disproportionately severe for first-time offenders who are not likely to…
Last week, the Department of Justice announced the first Foreign Corrupt Practices Act enforcement action of 2015, against Dmitrij Harder, the former owner and president of the Chestnut Consulting Group.  The allegations are premised, in part, on a seldom-used section of the FCPA: the statutory provision that prohibits bribing officials of public international organizations. According to the indictment, Harder operated the Chestnut Consulting Group entities, which provided consulting services to companies seeking financing from…
Earlier this week, Alstom S.A., a French multinational power and transportation company, pleaded guilty in the District of Connecticut to a two-count information charging it with violating the accounting provisions of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act.  The penalty levied against Alstom, over $772 million, will be the largest criminal fine that has ever been imposed under the FCPA.  Provided that the District Court approves the plea agreement negotiated between Alstom and the Department of Justice, the…
The U.S. Department of Justice recently publicized its second Foreign Corrupt Practices Act Opinion Procedure Release of 2014.  In the Release, the DOJ reiterated that an acquiring company may not inherit FCPA liability when the DOJ did not have jurisdiction over the target company’s prior corrupt activities. The DOJ has repeatedly asserted that, through principles of successor liability, an acquiring company in an M&A transaction may assume FCPA liability for the pre-acquisition bribes paid…