Steve Miller

Photo of Steve Miller

Steve focuses his practice on representing banks and other financial institutions. Steve provides advice and guidance on a broad array of operational, regulatory, and litigation matters as general outside counsel to certain of the firm's banking clients. He is also an experienced litigator who has spent his career representing banks in the courtroom, where he has handled cases involving creditors' rights, workouts and collections, bankruptcies, lender liability, deposit and investment accounts, securities fraud, and trusts. Steve has a deep knowledge of the industry that allows him to handle the most complex matters facing his clients, but is also part of a versatile team that can efficiently handle claims of any size and complexity.

Latest Articles

It can be hard for regulatory agencies to admit when they’ve made a mistake. But that’s exactly what FinCEN did last week when it announced that certain loan renewals and modifications[1] would not trigger its beneficial ownership due diligence rule (the “Rule”), reversing its earlier guidance on the subject. FinCEN’s change of heart is welcome relief for the industry, which decried FinCEN’s earlier position as failing to meaningfully advance any law enforcement goals while…
Since the Great Recession, the regulation of residential mortgages and those who service them have been in sharp focus. Legislators and regulators continue to demonstrate an abiding mistrust in the servicing industry a full decade after the financial collapse—imposing and then tinkering with a regulatory scheme that is challenging for most people (and most lawyers, for that matter!) to fully comprehend. In Washington alone, the regulations governing Washington’s Consumer Loan Act (CLA) have already been…
It turns out that even lawyers sometimes have to pay their debts. In a recent Washington appellate case, a bank successfully sued an attorney to recover on a loan made to his law firm. Typically the owner of a law firm wouldn’t be held responsible for the corporate debts of a firm (except under a separate personal guaranty). But after the firm ceased operations, the lawyer continued to operate the firm in a manner…
Negotiating the terms of a core processing contract makes haggling over a used car seem like child’s play. For most banks, the reality is stark—you might get some wiggle room on price if you’re willing commit to a longer term. You might also get a few changes on issues that “really matter.” But with only a few major core providers to choose from, these providers tend to think they hold most of the cards and…
In the wild west of fintech, state banking regulators have been called to act as the keepers of the peace and the primary enforcers of the law. That is, until the Office of the Comptroller of Currency (OCC) offered to become the new sheriff in town. The OCC unveiled its plan in December to offer special purpose national bank charters to fintech companies. The OCC argues its intervention is necessary to promote innovation that would…
Last week, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) officially opened its doors to financial technology companies and encouraged them to apply to become “special purpose” national banks. The premise is simple—become a national bank, abide by the OCC’s rules and regulations, and so-called “fintech” companies can avoid much of the thicket of uncoordinated state-by-state regulations that have stymied some industry innovators. This presents potentially huge opportunities for the more than 4,000 fintech…
Banks have long been a favorite target for lawsuits when their customers don’t take basic steps to oversee their employees who later bilk the customer for millions of dollars over the course of untold years. Customers often try to hold the bank liable for some nuance in the fraud, like a bookkeeper who issues company checks without signatory authority or an employee who makes an irregular indorsement to cash stolen checks. These claims effectively transform…