Aaron & Sanders PLLC

Aaron & Sanders PLLC Blogs

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Share on Facebook Share Share on Messenger Share Share on Twitter Share Share on Linkedin Share Share on Email Share Share on Print Share Maybe Don’t Calm Down This Time When it comes these high-profile music-and-copyright cases, my usual advice has been for everyone to calm down. In the “Blurred Lines” case, I explained that the facts were highly unusual, especially Robin Thicke’s admission that he and Pharrell were trying to imitate (if not…
Share on Facebook Share Share on Messenger Share Share on Twitter Share Share on Linkedin Share Share on Email Share Share on Print Share You Acquired Their Assets, But Did You Get Their Copyrights? The legal equivalent of this— I’m gonna throw these copyrights through your defenses! Whoops, no I’m not. —is trying to assert rights you only think you have. You cock your arm back, ready to throw your rights accurately through your adversary’s…
Share on Facebook Share Share on Messenger Share Share on Twitter Share Share on Linkedin Share Share on Email Share Share on Print Share Last Thursday, Xavier Becerra, the Attorney General of the State of California, held a press conference to announce the release of the first draft of the regulations to govern business conduct under the CCPA. The press conference was light on details, so privacy lawyers everywhere spent the end of last…
Share on Facebook Share Share on Messenger Share Share on Twitter Share Share on Linkedin Share Share on Email Share Share on Print Share Tara Aaron presented to an international trademark audience at the recent Pharmaceutical Trademark Group conference in Berlin, Germany, on October 3, 2019.  She gave a lecture to hundreds of trademark professionals and in-house pharmaceutical trademark attorneys from all over the world on the General Data Protection Regulation and the California Consumer…
Share on Facebook Share Share on Messenger Share Share on Twitter Share Share on Linkedin Share Share on Email Share Share on Print Share Whining About Wine The Winestore is a wine retailer based in North Carolina. And all it wants (for purposes of this discussion) is to sell a California cabernet sauvignon called OVERBROOK. The Winestore doesn’t make the wine, of course, but it appears that it’s the exclusive distributor. This means that…
Share on Facebook Share Share on Messenger Share Share on Twitter Share Share on Linkedin Share Share on Email Share Share on Print Share Copyright Claims Hardly Ever Go Away, But When They Do… The statute of limitations for copyright claims is three years from point from which you reasonably should have discovered the infringement. But if you file your copyright suit more than three years after that, “three years” will mean radically different things…
Share on Facebook Share Share on Messenger Share Share on Twitter Share Share on Linkedin Share Share on Email Share Share on Print Share One Word: Tactics My main post on the “Dark Horse” case1Which, remember, is way too early because the post-trial motions are still pending. focused on the very thin evidence of access. To my mind, that’s what the case should be reversed on. But something else has been bothering me: the “beat”…
Share on Facebook Share Share on Messenger Share Share on Twitter Share Share on Linkedin Share Share on Email Share Share on Print Share IP360 commissioned Rick to write an article about U.S. design law, which is best described as an awkward patchwork, through the lens of Texas antitrust case, of all things. That case involves traffic barriers and the Texas’ decision to require little V-cuts where the barriers meet. Both the plaintiff and the…
Share on Facebook Share Share on Messenger Share Share on Twitter Share Share on Linkedin Share Share on Email Share Share on Print Share Our Way-Too-Early Hot Take About the “Dark Horse” Jury Verdict There was shock and indignation at the July 29 jury verdict that a song called “Dark Horse” infringed a rap song1Always described as a “Christian” rap song, but I’m unclear what the religion has to do with the legal or even…
What an Antitrust Case Can Teach Us About Design When I was in law school in the late 1990’s, it was an article of faith that the U.S. didn’t protect industrial design, but Europe did, and that’s why Europeans were so much better at it than Americans. Think, for example, of the emphasis that Italians and French reputedly place on design. More accurately, several European countries had specific protection regimes for industrial design, and the…