Aaron & Sanders PLLC

Located in Nashville, Aaron | Sanders PLLC is an intellectual property and technology law firm. Their practice consists of trademarks, copyrights, privacy, internet, and solving business disputes. Founded in 2011 on the idea that all businesses deserve sophisticated affordable legal representation, Aaron | Sanders represent technology companies and start-ups in licensing matters and business disputes.

Aaron & Sanders PLLC Blogs

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Share on Facebook Share Share on Messenger Share Share on Twitter Share Share on Linkedin Share Share on Email Share Share on Print Share How Can Copyright Law Be Reformed to Avoid Results Like “Blurred Lines” and “Dark Horse”? Part 2. Damn the Damages! Full Speed Ahead! This is the third in a series of posts about the dread supposedly wrought by recent music copyright cases (all of which were filed in the same U.S.…
Share on Facebook Share Share on Messenger Share Share on Twitter Share Share on Linkedin Share Share on Email Share Share on Print Share Last week I read a smart post about some of the shortcomings of the now 20-day-old California Consumer Protection Act (CCPA), and how it may not cover downstream data resellers in any kind of an effective way. I encourage anyone working in the data protection space to read it. In the…
Share on Facebook Share Share on Messenger Share Share on Twitter Share Share on Linkedin Share Share on Email Share Share on Print Share Reforming Copyright Law Last time, I questioned the premises and theses of the common notion that the “Blurred Lines,” “Stairway to Heaven” and “Dark Horse” cases are chilling creativity. My main point was that the only way to determine whether this was happening is to assess whether quality of popular…
Share on Facebook Share Share on Messenger Share Share on Twitter Share Share on Linkedin Share Share on Email Share Share on Print Share And What Should We Do About It? Ever since the shocking “Blurred Lines” jury verdict, there has been a steady drum beat about how that case, and some subsequent music-and-copyright cases, has chilled songwriting. Since “Blurred Lines,” the same U.S. District Court has seen contentious, high-profile jury verdicts in a case…
Share on Facebook Share Share on Messenger Share Share on Twitter Share Share on Linkedin Share Share on Email Share Share on Print Share 2019 will be remembered as the year we still tried to figure to get the GDPR right, we spent time trying to understanding what “sale” will mean under CCPA, and we went through about two data breaches a day. Will next year be more of the same? The CCPA will come…
Share on Facebook Share Share on Messenger Share Share on Twitter Share Share on Linkedin Share Share on Email Share Share on Print Share When Is it Appropriate to Knock Out a Copyright Case Based on Lack of Substantial Similarity? Last week, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals revised its opinion in the “Haters Gonna Hate” case, Hall v. Swift, which I blogged about recently. The main holding remains the same, i.e., Swift’s early…
Share on Facebook Share Share on Messenger Share Share on Twitter Share Share on Linkedin Share Share on Email Share Share on Print Share Why Did the Easy One Fail and the Hard One Succeed? Many years ago, the Vinh-Sanh Trading Corporation began selling rice it imported from southeast Asia under the following trademark, which it called the THREE LADIES BRAND: Here it is on a bag of Thai jasmine rice: The three women…
Share on Facebook Share Share on Messenger Share Share on Twitter Share Share on Linkedin Share Share on Email Share Share on Print Share You Must Be THIS Tall for Copyright Protection Last time I said you should “hate hate hate” a decision from the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals that reversed Taylor Swift’s victory in a copyright case based the lyrics, “’Cause the players gonna play, play, play, play, play/ And the haters gonna…
Share on Facebook Share Share on Messenger Share Share on Twitter Share Share on Linkedin Share Share on Email Share Share on Print Share Maybe Don’t Calm Down This Time When it comes these high-profile music-and-copyright cases, my usual advice has been for everyone to calm down. In the “Blurred Lines” case, I explained that the facts were highly unusual, especially Robin Thicke’s admission that he and Pharrell were trying to imitate (if not…
Share on Facebook Share Share on Messenger Share Share on Twitter Share Share on Linkedin Share Share on Email Share Share on Print Share You Acquired Their Assets, But Did You Get Their Copyrights? The legal equivalent of this— I’m gonna throw these copyrights through your defenses! Whoops, no I’m not. —is trying to assert rights you only think you have. You cock your arm back, ready to throw your rights accurately through your adversary’s…