Aaron & Sanders PLLC

Located in Nashville, Aaron | Sanders PLLC is an intellectual property and technology law firm. Their practice consists of trademarks, copyrights, privacy, internet, and solving business disputes. Founded in 2011 on the idea that all businesses deserve sophisticated affordable legal representation, Aaron | Sanders represent technology companies and start-ups in licensing matters and business disputes.

Aaron & Sanders PLLC Blogs

Latest from Aaron & Sanders PLLC

WHO WE WERE AND WHO WE ARE We are so thrilled to share this milestone with you. Ten years ago, Rick and Tara opened the doors on a law firm built to serve technology start-ups and small businesses in Nashville. We began as an intellectual property, technology and dispute resolution firm. Since that time, we have expanded our practice, with Tara becoming certified in both U.S. and EU data protection laws. We have also expanded…
I recently co-authored a short article earlier this month for the International Trademark Association Bulletin. In it, we discuss the recent cross-border data transfer issues wrought upon the EU and the US since the Schrems II decision last year and its aftermath. In fact, the decision has messed with data transfers out of the EU to nearly every other country in the world.Not long after the INTA Bulletin article, a report suggested that there…
Oracle v. Google Is Over. And Rick Can Stop Blogging About It Forever. I was in the middle of writing a blog post about The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. v. Goldsmith—you know, the one about Andy Warhol’s use of a photograph of Prince1The musician, not Richard Prince, the prick-ish “appropriation artist” who might make an appearance later in this post, we’ll see. jQuery(‘#footnote_plugin_tooltip_5814_2_1’).tooltip({ tip: ‘#footnote_plugin_tooltip_text_5814_2_1’, tipClass: ‘footnote_tooltip’, effect:…
The Case That’s More “Oracle v. Google” Than Oracle v. Google While we wait for the Supreme Court to hand down its decision in Oracle v. Google, we can have some fun with a case that might be exactly what folks are afraid Oracle v. Google is: use of copyright law to inhibit  competition unrelated (or barely related) to the copyrighted work. The case is Pyrotechnics Mgmt., inc. v. XFX Pyrotechnics LLC, and,…
Party Like it’s 2006 I mentioned last time that the gigantic Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 (remember that?) had three “IP”-related Easter eggs, two for trademark and one for copyright. I blogged about the copyright one last time, the “copyright small claims court.” Tara has previously blogged about the trademark Easter Eggs, but I wanted to expand and emphasize one of them here: the restoration of the presumption of irreparable harm for trademark injunctions. Is…
Last time, Tara discussed one of the three intellectual-property Easter eggs in that massive must-pass “Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021.” You probably know the bill better as “that gigantic omnibus spending bill” or perhaps the “COVID-19 Relief Bill.” Tara discussed the two trademark-related Easter eggs. I’ll focus on the copyright one now. The copyright Easter egg is a kind of small-claims court for copyright claims. It’s supposed to deal with a problem—a real problem, I’d…
On December 27, 2020, the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 was signed into law. This massive 5660 page bill consolidated Covid-19 economic assistance to America with an omnibus 2021 bill that covers everything from pipelines to Asian carp. It also resolves a decades-long discussion in U.S. copyright circles by enacting a small claims adjudication body, makes it a felony to run an internet business the purpose of which is to stream infringing content, and makes the…
Panning for Bad Code Software cases are few and far between here in the Sixth U.S. Circuit, which includes Tennessee along with Kentucky, Ohio and Michigan. Other U.S. Circuits have hubs for software development—e.g, California and Washington in the Ninth, Texas in the Fifth, Utah and the Tenth, Massachusetts in the First. But the Sixth Circuit is the Motown-to-Music-City circuit. Music cases we have in abundance. Software cases, not so much. But I’m a software…
The U.S. Supreme Court will hold oral argument in Oracle v. Google on October 7. It’s supposed to be one of the most important copyright cases in decades. Not only will the Supreme Court visit computer programs for the first time since 1996’s Lotus v. Borland, which decided nothing because it was a 4-4 tie. I’ve blogged repeatedly about this case. The most important posts are this one, where I ate humble
What a Fight Between Two Lines of Stuffed Animals Teaches Us About Trade Dress and Functionality I’ve warned you about trying to protect “designs” in the U.S. before. Outside of design patents (which are rare and not always an option), U.S. law doesn’t really recognize “designs.” It recognizes sculptures (under copyright law) and trade dress (under trademark law). Both have their limitations. Let’s say you want to protect this “design”: A single Squishmallow, downloaded…