Danko Meredith

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Both the Department of Justice and Transportation Department’s inspector general are investigating the FAA’s approval of the Boeing 737 Max and, in particular, the aircraft’s anti-stall system known as MCAS. The FAA is supposed to ensure that Boeing aircraft are safe. Investigators want to know: Are the FAA and Boeing too cozy? Is the FAA’s oversight is too lax? Is it true that the FAA didn’t actually certify the Max’s anti-stall system as safe but…
The Boeing 737 The Boeing 737 was originally intended for short haul flights to short runways.  One of the 737’s unique design features was that the engines were mounted on the underside of the wing, instead of in front of the wings on struts and pylons. Mounting the engines hard up against the wing decreased drag, reduced weight, improved the aircraft’s center of gravity, made the cabin quieter, increased usable cabin space, and made the…
This week PG&E appeared in bankruptcy court to answer questions under oath put to it by wildfire survivors and other creditors. PG&E and its lawyers resisted answering some questions and, in one instance, outright refused to do so even after being directed to answer by the United States Bankruptcy Trustee. (So much for PG&E’s commitment to “transparency” during the bankruptcy process.) One of the first questions put to PG&E was why it filed bankruptcy. Usually…
EgyptAir Flight 990 departed JFK for Cairo. After reaching cruise altitude near Nantucket, it suddenly pitched down and crashed into the Atlantic Ocean. There was no apparent reason for the crash. The NTSB ultimately concluded that the cause of the crash was the co-pilot’s “intentional actions.” Specifically, the pilot suddenly pushed the yoke forward and held it there, killing all 217 aboard. The Egyptian government disagreed with the NTSB’s conclusion, instead blaming the crash on…
PG&E asked the bankruptcy judge to approve bonuses to its employees totaling $130 million.  We objected, arguing that “every dollar PG&E pays out to its executives in bonuses is a dollar the victims who were burned out by those executives don’t get.” While sympathetic to our argument, the bankruptcy judge ruled that, under the controlling bankruptcy law, he had no alternative but to approve PG&E’s request. Now, buckling to pressure from the Northern California Fire Lawyers as well…
When it filed bankruptcy, PG&E committed to pay its army of bankruptcy lawyers on a monthly basis many millions of dollars in fees.  Some of that money might better be directed to PG&E victims who have been homeless for years now, especially since PG&E swears in court that it filed it bankruptcy to serve the best interests of its victims. Just how much will the bankruptcy lawyers take from the pot?  Hard to say exactly,…
Judge Alsup ruled that PG&E violated the felony probation imposed upon it after the San Bruno explosion. While PG&E says safety is its number one priority, the judge said that is untrue.  Rather, PG&E’s number one priority seems to be profits. In 2017 alone, PG&E was responsible for starting 17 wildfires that destroyed thousands of homes and burned alive 22 people.    The judge believes it is his job to protect the public from future…