Ferro Labella & Weiss LLC

We are located in the historic Landmark Building in Hackensack, New Jersey, the Bergen County seat, and also have an office in White Plains, New York. Founded by Michael J. Ferro, Jr. in 1978, the firm focused on providing corporate counseling to businesses and their executive management. The firm’s practice expanded considerably over the years to include commercial litigation, fiduciary and probate litigation, tax, commercial real estate, internal compliance investigations, estate planning, white collar defense, and related specialties. The firm has continued to meet the challenges clients face in a rapidly changing business environment by expanding into areas such as information technology, employment and health-care law. Ferro Labella & Weiss maintains the highest ratings possible with Martindale-Hubbell, including membership in the Bar Register of Preeminent Lawyers. All of our Members have been selected for inclusion in Super Lawyers Magazine by Law & Politics. We are committed to assisting our clients in achieving their goals through strategic collaboration, careful planning, and consistent delivery of legal services.

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Latest from Ferro Labella & Weiss LLC

By: Peter J. Gallagher (LinkedIn) It has become a staple of teen/tween movies: Younger sibling has the same teacher as older sibling. Younger sibling hands in the same paper that older sibling used for that teacher a few years prior. Younger sibling gets caught, parents are called, awkward meeting with principal follows, younger sibling is punished, hilarity ensues. Minus the hilarity ensuing, we now have the legal version of this trope. In Conboy
By: Peter J. Gallagher (LinkedIn) It has become a staple of teen/tween movies: Younger sibling has the same teacher as older sibling. Younger sibling hands in the same paper that older sibling used for that teacher a few years prior. Younger sibling gets caught, parents are called, awkward meeting with principal follows, younger sibling is punished, hilarity ensues. Minus the hilarity ensuing, we now have the legal version of this trope. In Conboy
By: Peter J. Gallagher (LinkedIn) There may come a day when the law regarding the enforceability of arbitration agreements is so well settled that courts no longer have to deal with the issue, but that day has not yet arrived. In Jasicki v. Morgan Stanley Smith Barney, LLC, the Appellate Division was once again asked to determine the enforceability of an arbitration agreement between employer and employee. Unlike many cases, however, the…
by: Peter J. Gallagher (LinkedIn) The Appellate Division recently invoked the great Inigo Montoya in a decision on New Jersey’s law against “operating a vehicle while under the influence.” (For those who don’t know Inigo Montoya from The Princess Bride or are unfamiliar with his famous observation – “You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means” – shame on you, but also click here.)…
by: Peter J. Gallagher (LinkedIn) In what has become more and more common in recent years, a New Jersey court recently had to decide whether to allow a plaintiff to serve a defendant over Facebook rather than in person or through other more traditional means. In 252 Main NM, LLC v. John R. Heywang, Lauran Heywang, and American Express Centurion Bank, the trial court’s ruling was a mix of the old and…
by: Peter J. Gallagher (LinkedIn) In Pathri v. Kakarlamath, the issue before the court was whether a witness could testify via contemporaneous video transmission in a divorce trial. The trial court denied the witness’s request to do so and the issue went up on appeal, where the Appellate Division began its decision, naturally, by referencing Gilbert & Sullivan’s “The Major General’s Song” from The Pirates of Penzance: In most respects,…
by: Peter J. Gallagher (LinkedIn) The New Jersey Supreme Court’s recent decision in Shields v. Ramslee Motors, is the latest in a seemingly endless series of cases dealing with the duties of landlords and tenants to keep their property clear of snow and ice. These cases usually involve sidewalks, but Shields involved a driveway. In Shields, plaintiff was a Federal Express delivery man. After delivering an envelope to the tenant’s car dealership,…
by: Peter J. Gallagher (LinkedIn) Procedural issues are usually pretty boring, but the issue in N.J. Div. of Child Prot. & Permanency v. A.L. is different. OK. It might still be boring to most, but it is interesting (or at least informative) if you have ever spent weeks researching and drafting an appeal only to have an appellate court reject your position with a short opinion. The underlying case in A.L. is sad,…
by: Peter J. Gallagher (LinkedIn) Arbitration awards are rarely overturned. The standard to vacate an award is high, and judicial review of awards is often unexacting. So when a court overturns an award, it is usually worth a closer look. And one recent decision from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, Monster Energy Company v. City Beverages , LLC, is definitely worth a closer look. In Monster, the court…
by: Peter J. Gallagher (LinkedIn) After reading the opening paragraph of the Appellate Division’s decision in Rivera v. Canseo, I was hooked. Here it is: [Plaintiff] owns a female chihuahua. Defendant . . . owns a male Chihuahua. [Plaintiff] and [defendant] reached an oral agreement to have their dogs mate. [Plaintiff] was to obtain puppies from the mating and [defendant] was to receive consideration for the use of his dog. Interesting facts,…