Ferro Labella & Weiss LLC

We are located in the historic Landmark Building in Hackensack, New Jersey, the Bergen County seat, and also have an office in White Plains, New York. Founded by Michael J. Ferro, Jr. in 1978, the firm focused on providing corporate counseling to businesses and their executive management. The firm’s practice expanded considerably over the years to include commercial litigation, fiduciary and probate litigation, tax, commercial real estate, internal compliance investigations, estate planning, white collar defense, and related specialties. The firm has continued to meet the challenges clients face in a rapidly changing business environment by expanding into areas such as information technology, employment and health-care law. Ferro Labella & Weiss maintains the highest ratings possible with Martindale-Hubbell, including membership in the Bar Register of Preeminent Lawyers. All of our Members have been selected for inclusion in Super Lawyers Magazine by Law & Politics. We are committed to assisting our clients in achieving their goals through strategic collaboration, careful planning, and consistent delivery of legal services.

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By: Peter J. Gallagher (LinkedIn) From the Appellate Division comes another case that sounds more like a law school hypothetical than real life. Here is the scenario: A driver is pulled over for a traffic offense. Signs point to the driver being intoxicated, but the police don’t conduct a field sobriety test. Instead, the officers allow the driver to call a friend to drive him home. The driver’s friend arrives and assures the…
By: Peter J. Gallagher (LinkedIn) In a case with facts that could have been ripped from a torts exam, the Appellate Division held that a woman who jumped into a canal to try to save a neighbor’s dog could not sue the neighbor under the rescue doctrine because the doctrine applies only to people trying to rescue other people, not people trying to rescue animals. In Samolyk v. Berthe, plaintiff claimed that…
By: Peter J. Gallagher (LinkedIn) As summer is about to (unofficially) begin, a timely post about mixing drinking, dancing, and pools. (Spoiler alert: It usually doesn’t turn out great.) As a side note, in the 1990’s I occasionally went to shows at Tradewinds in Sea Bright. It was a pool/beach club that held concerts on weekend nights (I was there when Bruce Springsteen showed up to play with Steve Earle.) There…
By: Peter J. Gallagher (LinkedIn) When the history of arbitration agreements in New Jersey is written – OK, maybe that is an “if” more than a “when” – it will owe a great debt to trampoline parks. Over the past several years, New Jersey courts have issued numerous decisions regarding the enforceability of arbitration agreements at these parks. I have written about several of them – “Court Bounces Trampoline Park’s Arbitration Provision
By: Peter J. Gallagher (LinkedIn) Just before the pandemic turned nearly all New Jersey courtrooms virtual, the Appellate Division issued its decision in Pathri v. Kakarlamath, which dealt with the standards trial courts should use to assess a party’s request to appear remotely for trial. I wrote about it here “Before Applying a 30-Year Old Decision to Modern Technology, A New Jersey Court References A Musical From the 1890’s.” Who…
By: Peter J. Gallagher (LinkedIn) It is not often that my fondness for both hip hop and interesting legal decisions collide, but the Appellate Division’s recent decision in Morgan v. Maxwell is one such occasion. The lead defendant in Morgan was Willie Maxwell II, known to his fans as Fetty Wap. And the issue in the case was the so-called golden rule. Not the “do-unto-others” golden rule we teach our children, but…
By: Peter J. Gallagher (LinkedIn) It has become a staple of teen/tween movies: Younger sibling has the same teacher as older sibling. Younger sibling hands in the same paper that older sibling used for that teacher a few years prior. Younger sibling gets caught, parents are called, awkward meeting with principal follows, younger sibling is punished, hilarity ensues. Minus the hilarity ensuing, we now have the legal version of this trope. In Conboy
By: Peter J. Gallagher (LinkedIn) It has become a staple of teen/tween movies: Younger sibling has the same teacher as older sibling. Younger sibling hands in the same paper that older sibling used for that teacher a few years prior. Younger sibling gets caught, parents are called, awkward meeting with principal follows, younger sibling is punished, hilarity ensues. Minus the hilarity ensuing, we now have the legal version of this trope. In Conboy
By: Peter J. Gallagher (LinkedIn) There may come a day when the law regarding the enforceability of arbitration agreements is so well settled that courts no longer have to deal with the issue, but that day has not yet arrived. In Jasicki v. Morgan Stanley Smith Barney, LLC, the Appellate Division was once again asked to determine the enforceability of an arbitration agreement between employer and employee. Unlike many cases, however, the…
by: Peter J. Gallagher (LinkedIn) The Appellate Division recently invoked the great Inigo Montoya in a decision on New Jersey’s law against “operating a vehicle while under the influence.” (For those who don’t know Inigo Montoya from The Princess Bride or are unfamiliar with his famous observation – “You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means” – shame on you, but also click here.)…