Ferro Labella & Weiss LLC

We are located in the historic Landmark Building in Hackensack, New Jersey, the Bergen County seat, and also have an office in White Plains, New York. Founded by Michael J. Ferro, Jr. in 1978, the firm focused on providing corporate counseling to businesses and their executive management. The firm’s practice expanded considerably over the years to include commercial litigation, fiduciary and probate litigation, tax, commercial real estate, internal compliance investigations, estate planning, white collar defense, and related specialties. The firm has continued to meet the challenges clients face in a rapidly changing business environment by expanding into areas such as information technology, employment and health-care law. Ferro Labella & Weiss maintains the highest ratings possible with Martindale-Hubbell, including membership in the Bar Register of Preeminent Lawyers. All of our Members have been selected for inclusion in Super Lawyers Magazine by Law & Politics. We are committed to assisting our clients in achieving their goals through strategic collaboration, careful planning, and consistent delivery of legal services.

Ferro Labella & Weiss LLC Blogs

Blog Authors

Latest from Ferro Labella & Weiss LLC

by: Peter J. Gallagher (LinkedIn) This should probably be obvious, but apparently it wasn’t, at least to one California lawyer. So, in a published opinion, Briganti v. Chow, the California Court of Appeals included a “Note on Civility, Sexism, and Persuasive Brief Writing” to remind that attorney, and all of us, that this is not a good way to start a brief . The dispute in Briganti was straightforward. Plaintiff sued defendant…
by: Peter J. Gallagher (LinkedIn) For the uninitiated landlord, New Jersey landlord-tenant court can be a bit of a shock. The deck seems insurmountably stacked in the tenant’s favor. And when a landlord acquires its property via foreclosure, the process is even more confusing. A recent trial court decision, UTS Bechman, LLC v. Woodard, is a good example of how confusing, and sometimes counter intuitive, landlord-tenant court can seem to a landlord.…
by: Peter J. Gallagher (LinkedIn) Winter is right around the corner. Unfortunately, that means snow is also just around the corner. But it also means that its time for another case about someone allegedly being injured after slipping and falling in the snow. The facts of these slip and fall cases often read like law school exam questions. I have written about several of them in the past, from the relatively straightforward (…
by: Peter J. Gallagher (LinkedIn) Maybe it is because I was a journalism major in college, but I am a sucker for a good lede. The district court’s decision in West v. Emig has a great one. It begins: Christopher H. West is an inmate who has frequently ingested inedible objects. During his incarceration, he has eaten the foam from inside his mattress, and he has also swallowed writing instruments, including pens.…
by: Peter J. Gallagher (LinkedIn) In the final scene of the movie Scent of a Woman, Al Pacino’s character defends Chris O’Donnell’s character, who is about to be expelled from the (fictional) prestigious Baird School. Among many other things, Pacino’s character exclaims: “I don’t know who went to this place. William Howard Taft. William Jennings Bryant. William Tell, whoever. Their spirit is dead, if they ever had one.” Similarly, although…
by: Peter J. Gallagher (LinkedIn) I don’t usually write about personal jurisdiction because it is . . . well . . . a little boring. But I do enjoy creative legal arguments (including creative arguments about jurisdiction), so I am going to make an exception here. The Third Circuit recently issued its decision in in Robinson v. Section 23 Property Owner’s Association, Inc., which is the latest in what appears to…
by: Peter J. Gallagher (LinkedIn) If you thought this would be a salacious post, prepare to be underwhelmed. It is about what it means to “consummate” a contract. In Fed Cetera, LLC v. National Credit Services, Inc., defendant was a debt collection agency seeking opportunities to contract with the federal government. To do so, defendant had to follow a “convoluted but – within the industry – well-known path.” Defendant first had to…
by: Peter J. Gallagher (@pjsgallagher) (LinkedIn) Every now and again I read a decision that leaves me with lots of unanswered, and perhaps unanswerable, questions. Asphalt Paving Systems, Inc. v. Associated Asphalt Partners, LLC is one of those cases. In Asphalt Paving, plaintiff and defendants settled their lawsuit shortly after plaintiff filed its complaint. They agreed that any disputes over the terms of the settlement agreement would be resolved through arbitration, and…
by: Peter J. Gallagher (@pjsgallagher) (LinkedIn) If ever a lawyer should have been awarded points for creativity, Diaco Construction, Inc. v. Ohio Security Ins. Co. is the case where it should have happened. It is an insurance coverage dispute, but don’t stop reading just because of that. The underlying facts are interesting and the insured’s lawyer’s arguments, though ultimately unsuccessful, were creative. The facts in Diaco were summarized succinctly by the Appellate…
by: Peter J. Gallagher (@pjsgallagher) (LinkedIn) As any Seinfeld fan knows, you cannot “yada yada” over the best part of a story. But in a recent decision, a New Jersey court did just that. In Barry v. Melmed Construction Company, Inc., the court spent eleven pages discussing a relatively routine case where defendant waived the right to enforce the arbitration provision in its contract with plaintiffs – defendant waited too…