Kirwin Norris, P.A.

We understand the needs and nuances of the construction process, the complexities of construction law, and the importance of managing and resolving issues in a timely manner to keep your project progressing on time and on budget. Should you be facing litigation, we have an enviable track record of success in state and federal courts. We have in-depth, up-to-the-moment knowledge, along with the valuable industry relationships, that can give you an advantage both on the project site and in the courtroom. Kirwin Norris’ team of dedicated attorneys is located in our Orlando and Fort Lauderdale offices.

Latest from Kirwin Norris, P.A.

In a prior article I discussed a material escalation provision in your construction contract to account for the volatility of the material price market.  While including such a provision may not have been much of a forethought before, it is now! What about concerns with the actual supply chain that impacts the availability of and the lead time of materials?  How are you addressing this concern in your construction contract? The pandemic has raised awareness to…
As you may know, material prices have been climbing.  And they continue to climb based on the volatility of the material market.  On top of that, there are lead times in getting material due to supply chain and other related concerns.   The question is, how are you addressing these risks?  These are risks that need to be addressed in your contract. As it relates to climbing material prices, one consideration is a material escalation provision. …
The recent opinion out of the Eastern District Court of Virginia, Dickson v. Forney Enterprises, Inc., 2021 WL 1536574 (E.D.Virginia 2021),  demonstrates that the federal Miller Act is not designed to protect ALL that perform work on a federal construction project.   This is because NOT ALL work is covered under the Miller Act. In this case, a professional engineer was subcontracted by a prime contractor to serve on site in a project management /…
  When it comes to proving a construction cost, particularly a cost in dispute, the cost must be REASONABLE.   Costs subject to claims must be reasonably incurred and the party incurring the costs must show the costs are reasonable. An example of the burden falling on the contractor to prove the reasonableness of costs is found in government contracting. “[T]here is no presumption that a [government] contractor is entitled to reimbursement ‘simply because it…
There is value to a seller when it comes to entering into an as-is transaction and stating that the seller has NOT made any representation or warranty, all such representations or warranties are disclaimed, the buyer is NOT relying on any representation of the seller, and that the buyer is relying on its own inspection of the property.   This shifts the onus to the buyer to undertake the inspection or due diligence it needs…
In recent posts (here and here) I have discussed arbitration provisions and cases dealing with the enforceability of arbitration provisions. The case of Lemos v. Sessa, 46 Fla.L.Weekly D701a (Fla. 3d DCA 2021) deals with two noteworthy principles when it comes to arbitration that warrant another post about arbitration provisions. First, courts will and should try to resolve any ambiguity in arbitration provisions in favor of arbitration.  Second, when there is an offending…
Insurance policies, particularly property insurance policies, have a concealment or fraud provision that, in essence, gives the insurer an out if the insured submits a fraudulent claim, a false claim, or conceals material facts.   Unlike a traditional fraud claim where a party needs to prove intent, the provision is broad enough that it does not require any intent behind making a false statement.  See Mezadieu v. Safepoint Ins. Co., 46 Fla.L.Weekly D691c (Fla. 4th DCA…
In the prior posting, I discussed arbitration provisions and to clearly and unmistakably include in the arbitration provision the person — judge or arbitrator — you want to determine the arbitrability of a given dispute. In another posting, I discussed how the doctrine of equitable estoppel can be used by a non-signatory to a contract with an arbitration provision to compel arbitration or to compel a non-signatory to arbitration. This occurs “when a signatory to a contract…
As you know from prior postings: “Arbitration provisions are creatures of contract and must be construed ‘as a matter of contract interpretation.’ ”  Fallang Family Limited Partnership v. Privcap Companies, LLC, 46 Fla.L.Weekly D639e (Fla. 4th DCA 2021) (citation omitted).    Thus, if you prefer to arbitrate potential disputes, instead of litigating potential disputes, you want to include an arbitration provision in your contract.  While there are positives and negatives to arbitration, no different than…