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Speed up Chrome with one click. Net Marketshare reports that Chrome is the number one browser with usage at 64.15% for 2018. Unbelievably, Internet Explorer holds second spot at 10.83% with Firefox third at 9.89%. We use Chrome as well and it’s no secret that it is the most popular browser. There’s a lot of reasons people favor Chrome (e.g. simplicity, security, etc.), but speed is typically not one of them. Chrome isolates each tab,…
On January 14th, Forbes reported that a California judge had ruled that American cops can’t force people to unlock a mobile phone with their face or finger. The ruling goes further to protect people’s private lives from government searches than any previous ruling and is being hailed as a potentially landmark decision. Previously, U.S. judges had ruled that police were allowed to force unlock devices like Apple’s iPhone with biometrics, such as fingerprints, faces or…
You can’t determine what happened if you don’t have some sort of history of events. That’s why people install surveillance cameras. It’s also why software developers have logging capability. Many of our security and forensic investigations are significantly crippled because logs don’t exist or minimal data is captured. That’s because most applications don’t enable logging by default. The same is true for Microsoft Office 365. The good news is that starting February 1, Microsoft will…
Naked Security reported on January 14th that government websites are shutting down as their TLS certificates expire. Internet security and statistics company Netcraft says that more than 80 websites using the .gov domain have been made insecure or inaccessible thanks to expired certificates. TLS certificates are used by websites communicating over encrypted, HTTPS connections. A certificate is used to sign a website’s public encryption key, which ensures that your communication with that website is private…
When software goes out of support, it no longer receives any updates including security patches. Windows XP has been in that state for some time and Windows 7 goes out of support in a year on January 14, 2020. Windows 7 is still one of the most widely used operating systems. In December 2018, NetMarketShare reported that 39.2% of machines are using Windows 10 and 36.9% are running Windows 7. So budget now for the…
Last week’s blog post, and the story behind it (the botched redaction of documents in Paul Manafort’s case) generated a lot of comments and questions, so I decided it was worth doing a follow-up post. Here is the “redacted document.” Some people asked how you could “uncover the text.” Scroll down to the portion of the document that has black highlighted text. Highlight that portion of the document, copy it, and then…
Just when you think you’ve seen it all, up pops a story from May 2018 that I missed. David Seale, a resident of California, was arrested and charged with commercial burglary after he broke into a Fresno office building, did a little celebratory breakdancing and left with a laptop stolen from a law firm. According to the story from Daily News, surveillance video shows Seale in the lobby of the law firm on May 6,…
Approximately 30% of websites are powered by WordPress. Obviously, it is an extremely popular platform for a lot of businesses. It’s also an environment that is subject to a lot of attacks trying to take advantage of vulnerabilities since it is the most popular platform. According to Bleeping Computer, WordPress related vulnerabilities increased by 300% in 2018. But wait. The base WordPress platform isn’t the problem. WordPress plugins are responsible for 98% of the WordPress…
A post in Axios by Joe Uchill summed it up: “The government is on hiatus. Enemies of the U.S. are not.” During the government shutdown, essential personnel are exempt from the furlough — so in theory, anyone fighting on the cybersecurity front lines is at work. But experts believe the loss of support staff makes the cybersecurity effects of a shutdown bad in the short term and worse in the long term. “Defending federal networks…
Some recent updates of Windows 10 have failed because there wasn’t enough disk space available to complete the update process. Windows doesn’t currently check for available disk space prior to attempting to install an update. A change is coming with a future Microsoft update. ZDNet reports, “Microsoft is introducing ‘reserved storage’, which will keep around 7GB of disk space — but possibly more — available purely so that updates can be installed smoothly.” We’ll…