Thomas M. Crowley, Attorney and Counselor At Law

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Just a short post to bring you all up to date on where the Supreme Court is, or isn’t, with its cases. There are still 27 argued cases to be handed down, and still the only major cases that have been decided are Timbs (covered in my last post) and Apple, decided May 13, which held that  purchasers of apps for their iPhones through Apple’s App Store were direct purchasers from Apple (as opposed to…
The Supreme Court is on a short break until May 9, having completed the arguments for this term. Now its time to issue all the remaining opinions before the end of the term (the last week of June or very early July).  Here is where they stand: Dispositions by sitting (major cases in red, decided cases shaded gray, reargued cases struck through) (Source:  SCOTUSblog). [You can click on the case names to access the case,…
This post is about two cases that are currently before the Supreme Court. Both have been argued; we are just waiting for a decision in each. The first case is about whether a state can impose residency requirements on a seller of wine before that seller can sell wine. The second case concerns double jeopardy and what is called the dual sovereign doctrine which can trace its origins back 170 years. Tennessee Wine & Spirits
The October 2018 term is moving along, with all the “big” cases either awaiting decision or yet to be argued. Over the next few months, I will be highlighting the Supreme Court cases that I think are the most important–and the most interesting. But what makes a Supreme Court case important? (I’ll talk about “interesting” a bit later.) It’s a Supreme Court case, after all, so aren’t they all important? In one sense, yes: every…
As my final post for 2018, I plan to cover two topics, one that people have been talking about nearly non-stop and one that (I hope) will put a smile on your face to end the year. Some might call this post a bit schizophrenic. I prefer well-rounded. Can the President be indicted? I’m going to approach this issue from a purely legal standpoint. There are policy and political questions galore, some of which might…
On October 12, 2000, the guided-missile destroyer U.S.S. Cole was attacked while refueling in the port of Aden, Yemen. 17 American sailors were killed, 39 were injured. Al-Qaeda claimed responsibility for the attack; the Republic of Sudan was (and is) thought to have aided al-Qaeda.  On November 7, 2018, 38 years later, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in a suit brought by some of the injured sailors, their families, and the families of some of the…
They didn’t call it “The Paper Chase” for nothing. What have I been up to? Well, this photo should give you a clue. Along with blogging about the law, I have begun to practice it (again), I am now a volunteer attorney with the BIA Pro Bono Project of the Catholic Legal Immigration Network (CLINIC). What the lawyers in the program do is represent immigrants before the Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA). We are their…
We’ve all heard it. Whether it’s “What about her emails?” applied to Hilary Clinton or “There were good people on both sides” as applied to Charlottesville or “The CIA is just as bad as the KGB” back in the day and all the way back to Lenin (pictured above), the idea that one side is just as bad as the other has had a long and unhealthy life in the political and policy debates of…
As I posted last November, President Trump is the defendant in three separate lawsuits involving his alleged violation of both the Foreign and Domestic Emoluments Causes. (For those of you who are new to this topic, I recommend reading my original post, which gives you the background on the emoluments issue, the three cases, and links to more and updated information). This post is an update on the case brought by the District of…
“Treason” is one of those legal terms that people tend to use in conversation but have no real notion of what it means. And while it is acceptable at some level to use legal terms loosely in conversation because most listeners understand what is meant, “treason” is a term that carries such weight that I think care must be taken when we use the term and some knowledge of what is behind the term ought…