University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law

McGeorge educates lawyers for large and small law firms, government agencies and corporate legal departments in California, across the United States, and around the world. This has been our hallmark since 1924, and is truer today than ever before.

As the world grows smaller yet more complex, McGeorge responds by rigorously training our students for leadership positions in the global economy of the 21st century.

Our success is built on a distinguished faculty, high quality students, committed and involved alumni, and a beautiful, spacious campus with state-of-the art classrooms and student facilities.

University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law Blogs

Blog Authors

Latest from University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law

Law schools continue to tinker with the first-year curriculum, with some law schools adding Legislation and Regulation courses, others adding professionalism or professional identity-focused courses, still others adding international law courses, and a few affording students first-year electives.  Texas A&M University School of Law has added another possibility to the mix—a required, first-year, one-credit Dispute Resolution Survey course.   In January, all first-year A & M students must take the new course during the week prior…
On today’s episode of The CAP·impact Podcast I talk with Professor of Law and Director of the Immigration Clinic at Western State College of Law Jennifer Koh. Professor Koh’s work at the intersection of criminal law and immigration law is prolific, so there was a lot of ground for us to cover. One newer project that she is working on is the Orange County Justice Fund, which was formed to raise the money to…
      Today’s post is on AB 1531, which provides for new rules for the payment of court fees. This bill establishes specified rules regarding the payment of court fees when using an electronic filing service provider. Essentially, the bill requires, if a duplicate payment is made to a court by a party or an electronic service provided by either credit card or other electronic means for things like court filing fees, then the…
      Today’s post is on obstacles faced in the legislative process. As one might contemplate, there are numerous obstacles to overcome during the legislative process here in California. These are generally characterized as policy, fiscal, and political obstacles that may have to be addressed as a bill travels through the legislative process. Our effort here is to pose a few questions that one might want to ask before proceeding with a bill in…
AB 1565 (transcript) Today’s post is on AB 1565 from the 2018 legislative session, which concerns a new labor‑related liability rule for direct contractors. Governor Jerry Brown signed Assembly Bill 1565 by (then) state Assemblyman Tony Thurmond on September 19th as Chapter 528. As an urgency‑clause measure, the bill took effect on chaptering, which was September the 19th. It amends Labor Code Section 218.7 and creates a new labor‑related liability rule for direct contractors. AB…
New year, new style! We are shifting our focus on The CAP·impact Podcast from exclusively looking under the capitol dome in California and the surround sprawl of government buildings that make California’s state government to look at the tangible impacts legal academics are having on public policy at the local, state, and federal level all over the United States. We are kicking this new series off with an interview with Texas A&M Professor Saurabh Vishnubhakat,…
A significant number of my posts so far have focused on technological innovation.  This week’s post, however, focuses on an innovation that, for the most part, does not rely on technology. Drake University Law School launched a new Institute for Justice Reform and Innovation in July. The nonpartisan Institute serves as a center for research and training on topics including implicit bias, sentencing reform, and improving trial procedures; it forges relationships with lawyers, judges, former…
President Trump will address the nation tonight.  If he takes legal action, it will likely be to declare a national emergency under the National Emergencies Act of 1976.  The statute gives him wide leeway to decide what circumstances constitute an emergency.  He will declare the emergency to take advantage of two additional statutes, 10 USC 2808 and 33 USC 2293, which would allow him to reallocate Department of Defense construction funds to build the wall.…
SB 826 (transcript) Today’s post is on Senate Bill 826 from the 2018 legislative session concerning California’s new mandate on women on publicly traded corporate boards. Governor Brown signed SB 826 by State Senator Hannah Beth Jackson on September 30th. It was Chapter 954. It adds two new sections to California’s Corporations Code. Essentially the new law requires every publicly held corporation whose principal executive offices are located in the state of California to have…
  Challenges to Lawmaking in California’s Legislative Process (transcript) Today’s post is on the challenges to lawmaking in California’s legislative process. Individuals and groups engaging in California’s lawmaking process may find several challenges in their legislative endeavors. There are certainly institutional challenges as well as political challenges that complicate the legislative process. These challenges must be overcome to achieve a successful outcome in enacting state legislation. An initial, structural, challenge is California’s bicameral legislature and…