University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law

McGeorge educates lawyers for large and small law firms, government agencies and corporate legal departments in California, across the United States, and around the world. This has been our hallmark since 1924, and is truer today than ever before.

As the world grows smaller yet more complex, McGeorge responds by rigorously training our students for leadership positions in the global economy of the 21st century.

Our success is built on a distinguished faculty, high quality students, committed and involved alumni, and a beautiful, spacious campus with state-of-the art classrooms and student facilities.

The McGeorge Alternative Summer Advantage Program (“McGeorge ASAP”) is a self-directed volunteer summer legal research project created by alum Lexi Purich Howard and Asst. Dean of Career Development Molly Stafford in response to COVID-19.  The program matched McGeorge students who lost summer opportunities due to the pandemic with local attorneys for guidance on a research project on the topic of the student’s choosing.  This week’s ASAP paper was authored by Kelli Sanshey (2L, 2022) under…
I am once again joined by my colleagues Laura Curtis and Robert Moutrie on today’s video podcast about lobbying bills that have made it to one of the floors in the California Legislature. We discuss the similarities and major differences between lobbying bills in committee and lobbying bills on the floor. The topics covered in this video include how it’s possible to lobby all 120 members of the California Legislature, some do’s and don’t’s for…
Today’s podcast is a little bit different. Not only does today’s post feature video, rather than audio, it also features two of my colleagues – Robert Moutrie (Policy Advocate at the California Chamber of Commerce) and Laura Curtis (Legislative Advocate). I discuss with them their advice for lobbying committee staff and committee members in the California Legislature. The advice includes when to lobby committee staff and what to bring to those meetings, when to lobby…
All measures in the California Legislature are required to prominently display the Legislative Counsel’s Digest on the front page of the bill. So, what is this required section of every measure? According to the Legislative Counsel’s glossary of terms, the Digest is prepared by the Legislative Counsel and it summarizes the effect of a proposed bill on current law. It is on the first page of every bill, resolution, or constitutional amendment that is introduced…
The McGeorge Alternative Summer Advantage Program (“McGeorge ASAP”) is a self-directed volunteer summer legal research project created by alum Lexi Purich Howard and Asst. Dean of Career Development Molly Stafford in response to COVID-19.  The program matched McGeorge students who lost summer opportunities due to the pandemic with local attorneys for guidance on a research project on the topic of the student’s choosing.  This week’s ASAP paper was authored by Matt Urban (2L, 2022) under…
What is California’s reenactment rule? The state’s constitution, in Article IV, Section 9, states, “ A section of a statute may not be amended unless the section is reenacted as amended.” But what exactly does that mean? The courts have determined that the purpose of the reenactment rule is to avoid enacting statutes in terms so blind that legislators themselves are deceived in regard to their effect. The rule applies to bills that amend a…
On occasion, California statutes can be challenged in either state or federal court with the argument that the statute violates the California or United States Constitutions. So, on what bases can a statute be declared unconstitutional? One basis is vagueness. Essentially, the standard here is whether or not the statute is written with a reasonable enough degree of certainty that the average citizen could understand the meaning of the statute and how its provisions would…
The so-called revolving door in politics – elected officials leaving public service to work in the private sector lobbying their former colleagues – is no secret. In California, we have a number of rules and laws to slow the so-called revolving door. The rules can be found in Article IV, Section 5(e) of California’s Constitution. It states, “the Legislature shall enact laws that prohibit a Member of the Legislature whose term of office commences on…