Yates Campbell & Hoeg LLP

Specific Things I Do:
-Create wills, trusts (all kinds), powers of attorney, and medical directives
-Assist with probate of wills and the carrying out the instructions in wills
-Help trustees administer trusts properly
-Advise beneficiaries about their rights
-Create and alter business entities

Best Part of My Job:
My clients. Getting to know them–and being able to help them–is a joy.

Education:
Philosophy major at Georgetown, law school at George Washington, and an LL.M. in estate planning at the University of Miami.

Before Yates Campbell & Hoeg:
Solo trusts and estates lawyer, litigation paralegal, health law research assistant, legal intern at whistleblower protection firm, retail clothing salesperson, tennis coach’s assistant.

Latest from Yates Campbell & Hoeg LLP - Page 2

As time passes, circumstances change. Births, deaths, and divorces occur, fortunes are made and lost, health improves and deteriorates, and laws change. The creator of an irrevocable trust (called the “settlor”) might not have anticipated that changes in the tax laws would make inclusion of assets in his/her surviving spouse’s estate for estate tax purposes more beneficial than exclusion or that his/her child or grandchild would have special needs. In these kinds of situations, it…
Let’s start with some jargon. “Funding” a trust is what estate planning lawyers call the process of getting assets into a trust. When we say something is in a trust, owned by a trust, or funded to a trust, we’re being a bit imprecise. Traditionally, trusts don’t own things: trustees, in their capacities as trustees, own the trust assets. Deeds and other documents transferring property into trusts actually (and should) name the trustee, as trustee,…
A “power of attorney” is a legal document in which a person, called the “princial,” (let’s say that’s you) appoints another person, called an “agent,” to act for the principal in a specified capacity. Often, a power of attorney is “general,” giving the agent broad powers to manage the principal’s financial affairs (property, money, bills, taxes, etc.). Powers of Attorney can, alternatively, be “limited” by granting limited powers or powers over certaina assets. A Power…
Real estate includes your house, condo, vacation home, commercial building, and similar properties. Generally, a person who has a revocable trust will want that trust to be the owner and/or beneficiary of most of his/her assets: the purposes of the trust are served only as to the assets in or payable to the trust. Real estate is often one of the assets that should be owned by the trust. (Note: There are circumstances under which…
(or: why we have to ask the mortgage company for permission to transfer the rental property but not the house) People usually establish revocable trusts to facilitate the management of their assets if they become incapacitated and to avoid probate. Those purposes are only accomplished to the extent the trusts are funded (i.e., the assets of the people making the trusts are transferred to the trusts). Transferring mortgaged real estate to a revocable trust can…
(or: why we have to ask the mortgage company for permission to transfer the rental property but not the house) People usually establish revocable trusts to facilitate the management of their assets if they become incapacitated and to avoid probate. Those purposes are only accomplished to the extent the trusts are funded (i.e., the assets of the people making the trusts are transferred to the trusts). Transferring mortgaged real estate to a revocable trust can…